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1958 Bobby Fischer Newspaper Articles

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 02, 1958 - Page 4

At the end of eight rounds of the U.S. Chess Championship at the Marshall Club in New York, the lead was more or less shared by youthful Bobby Fischer, the national open champion, and Samuel Reshevsky, only active American grandmaster.
With two adjourned games to complete (one with Fischer, which appeared drawish), Reshevsky had a score of 5½-½. Fischer, with only his game against Reshevsky adjourned, had a mark of 6-1. Both were definitely ahead of the third and fourth men in the standings, William Lombardy (5½-2½) and James T. Sherwin (5-2).


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 05, 1958 - Page 70

Fischer Sets Pace In U.S. Championship
The oldest and the youngest of the 14 contestants are setting the pace in the tournament for the United States chess championship, being played at the Manhattan and Marshall Chess Clubs in New York.
Leader after nine rounds is 14-year-old Bobby Fischer, with a score of 7½-1½. The Brooklyn schoolboy has won six games and drawn three against Samuel Reshevsky, Herbert Seidman and Hans Berliner. Fischer, who last summer won the open championship of the U.S. Chess Federation, is playing steady and frequently brilliant chess, with mature skill in every department of the game.”


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 09, 1958 - Page 19

14-Year-Old Wizard Wins National Title
Fourteen-year-old Bobby Fischer has added the U.S. National Rosenwald Trophy to his U.S. Open and National Junior chess championships.
The Brooklyn schoolboy defeated 13 of the best players in the country to win the crown in three weeks of competition at the Manhattan and Marshall Chess Clubs in New York. He clinched the title Tuesday night and on Wednesday attended high school classes in Brooklyn as usual among friends of whom many, according to one intimate, “don't even know he plays chess.”
Bobby thus has achieved a competitive record that, at his age, is on a part with the Morphys, Capablancas and Reshevskys as a chess prodigy. Reshevsky, long regarded as the leading player of the United States and the Western world, was runnerup to Bobby in this tournament.
Throughout the tourney Fischer and Reshevsky alternated in the lead. Bobby took it for keeps Monday night when Reshevsky was beaten in an adjourned 10th round game by James T. Sherwin, then held to a 12th round draw by Edmar Mednis in a bitterly fought 78-move game. Meanwhile, Fischer drew ahead by defeating Atilio De Camillo of Philadelphia in an adjourned 11th round game and drawing with Arnold S. Denker in the 12th round.
None of the 12 contestants was within shooting distance of the top two stars at the finish.

★ ★ ★


This article also appears in,

  • The Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Saturday, January 11, 1958 - Page 2
  • Logansport Pharos-Tribune, Logansport, Indiana, Sunday, January 19, 1958 - Page 19
  • The Desert Sun, Palm Springs, California, Tuesday, January 28, 1958 - Page 7
  • Redlands Daily Facts, Redlands, California, Friday, January 10, 1958 - Page 2
  • Logansport Pharos-Tribune, Logansport, Indiana, Sunday, January 19, 1958 - Page 43
  • The Odessa American, Odessa, Texas, Monday, January 13, 1958 - Page 22
  • Pampa Daily News, Pampa, Texas, Sunday, January 12, 1958 - Page 3
  • The Amarillo Globe-Times, Amarillo, Texas, Monday, January 13, 1958 - Page 22
  • The News Journal, Wilmington, Delaware, Friday, January 10, 1958 - Page 17
  • Daily Independent Journal, San Rafael, California, Friday, January 10, 1958 - Page 6
  • Lubbock Evening Journal, Lubbock, Texas, Friday, January 10, 1958 - Page 19
  • Idaho State Journal, Pocatello, Idaho, Friday, February 21, 1958 - Page 46
  • The Alexandria Times-Tribune, Alexandria, Indiana, Monday, January 13, 1958 - Page 4
  • The Brownsville Herald, Brownsville, Texas, Sunday, January 12, 1958 - Page 20
  • Lubbock Evening Journal, Lubbock, Texas, Friday, January 10, 1958

Ukiah Daily Journal, Ukiah, California, Friday, January 10, 1958 - Page 2

Gangling 14-Year Old Surprises: Boy Upsets International Grandmaster in Chess Play
By DOC QUIGG

NEW YORK (UP)—Robert James Fischer, Brooklyn's gift to international eggheadism, sat there in shirtsleeves, tieless, biting his dirty fingernails, chewing his tongue, twisting his lanky schoolboy legs against the chair rungs as his gray eyes swept up and down the chessboard.
A chess authority in the crowd of spectators whispered in awe: “If he wins the title, it will be the greatest miracle in all chess history.”
Across the narrow room, in another final-round game of the tournament for the coveted U.S. chess championship, sat the great Samuel Reshevsky, an International Grandmaster and long regarded as one of the world's greatest players.

Reshevsky Confident
Reshevsky was a study in poise and confidence in a neat blue suit, cigarette perched between two fingers, arms folded, eyes blinking behind brown-rim glasses, his bald and bulging head shining a bit in the flourescent lighting. He sat beneath a portrait of himself, the only decoration on the gray walls of the tournament room of the 90-year-old Manhattan Chess Club.
On the archway entrance was pasted a penciled sign: “Spectators are requested not to snore in the tournament room.” This civilized way of yelling “Quiet!” was the only touch of humor as three nerve-wrecking weeks of chess play reached climax. It was the first national championship tournament in three years.
The 14 top players — including Bobby Fischer in his purple striped shirt, brown corduroy pants, blue socks, and heavy shoes — each played the others once. Late in the evening there was a winner and new champ, Bobby Fischer. The miracle had happened. For Bobby is only 14.
Reshevsky finished in second place.
Out in the lobby, Maurice J. Kasper, club president, was saying: “It's fantastic. It's unbelievable. Never in the history of the world has a 14-year-old boy been playing, and winning from, masters and grandmasters.”
Bobby is a very quiet boy. His reaction at the moment of winning was typical. He looked at his mother and said, “Let's go home.”
Asked Thursday, on the morning of his victory, if he would care to be interviewed for the papers, he said, “Nah, can't talk to you today.”. Did he think he would be able to talk some other day? “Nah, don't think so.”
His voice is piping, hasn't changed yet. But the top of his forward-brushed towhead reaches about five-feet-nine. He has a long nose and thin, angular face and he plays chess with a pleasantly studied air, flicking his head to the right occasionally as if rejecting strategy ideas.
During the final round he gangled into an anteroom between moves and a chuckling admirer cluthced his painfully thin shoulder and boomed: “Say, he's getting a little fat on 'um, hah?”
Bobby last summer won the U.S. Open Championship. With this new, and top, title he is eligible to be declared an International Grandmaster and compete for the world championship, now held by Vassily Smyslov of Russia. Bobby used to cry when he lost a game but he doesn't any more. For about a year now he hasn't had much chance to cry.


The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Saturday, January 11, 1958 - Page 14

14-Year-Old Champ
Chess may be a game for graybeards, but it's the young fellows who excel at it. The new United States champion is a 14-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy named Bobby Fischer.
To the best of our knowledge and belief, Bobby is the youngest person ever to win the national title; and we have never heard of any other country, now or in the past, with a champion that young. Most of the outstanding players of the past were impressive while they were still in short pants, but didn't win any really big championships until they were older.
The new champ replaces Samuel Reshevsky, who had been winning American championships so regularly that he seemed to have a permanent lease on the title. Sammy is a former child prodigy himself. Coming here from his native Poland as a small boy, he toured the country giving simultaneous exhibitions against scores of adults in various cities. Grown up, he became perennial national champion and an international grand master, who finished third in a tournament held to select a new world champion after the death of Alexander Alekhine a decade ago. But now he is pushing 50, which is rather old for a chess champion to retain his title. Tournament chess is a young man's game: surprisingly, it takes a lot of physical stamina.
Young Fischer, who deposed of Reshevsky this week, is a veteran who has been playing in tournaments for several years. Last year he won the U.S. Open title, but the Open is a less exalted event and Reshevsky was not entered. Now in the U.S. Championship Fischer has finished first, with a score of 9½-2½. The best Reshevsky could do was second, with 8½-3½.
Two losses late in the event were too much for the international grand master. He was defeated by William Lombardy, a young who went abroad in 1957 to bring home the world junior championship, and by James T. Sherwin, another young fellow. Fischer, the eventual winner, only drew in his game with Reshevsky but did better against the other entrants.
With such good young American players developing, it begins to look as if Russia's grip on the world championship might not be so secure as it has appeared to be during the last decade.


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 12, 1958 - Page 74

BOBBY FISCHER WINS U.S. CHAMPIONSHIP
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn won the United States chess championship without the loss of a game, winning nine and drawing five against most of the leading American masters.
Fischer, who is all of 14 years old and a student at Erasmus Hall High School, is the youngest national champion in the long history of chess. He is also the holder of the open championship of the U.S. Chess Federation, a title which he acquired in Cleveland last summer.
Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y., who was heavily favored to win, kept pace with Fischer through most of the tournament, each player leading at different times. A loss to James T. Sherwin in the 10th round put Reshevsky behind.
Starting the final round at the Manhattan Chess Club in New York, Fischer had a half-point margin. His opponent, Abe Turner, offered a draw after 18 moves. Fischer accepted, which gave him a certainty of a tie for first if Reshevsky should win, and the championship if the latter should lose or draw.
[…]
Reshevsky's final score was 9½-3½, which was good enough for second prize. He and Fischer earned the right to represent the United States in the Interzonal Tournament this summer, which is the next stage in the process of selection of a world championship challenger.


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 16, 1958 - Page 16

Chess With Sam Laird: Bobby Fischer Leads Free World Players

Bobby Fischer's triumph in the U.S. National Championship is still the talk of the chess world this week.
The 14-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy has gained heights seldom if ever attained by a player his age. He holds an unprecedented “triple crown” in the National title, the U.S. Open, and the National Junior Championship.
Bobby's victory in the National is the most stunning of the three, because it came over Samuel Reshevsky, long regarded as champion of the free world. Although the two drew in their meeting in the National, Bobby finished a clear point ahead of the older star, and for the first time Sammy's claim to leadership in the Western world is definitely subject to dispute.
Final standings of the tournament found Fischer a point out in front at 10½-2½; Reshevsky second at 9½-3½; Sherwin, 9-4; Lombardy, 7½-5½; Berliner, 7-6; Denker, Feuerstein and Mednis tied at 6½-6½; Seidman, 6-7; Bernstein and Bisguier, 5-8; DiCamillo and Turner, 4½-8½, and Kramer, 3-10.
The title was not decided till the final night and Reshevsky had a chance to tie for first right down to the finish. In the 13th and final round Fischer accepted a draw offered him by Al Turner after 18 moves. Reshevsky could have equaled his score by defeating William Lombardy, the junior world's champion. Instead Lombardy won an exciting game in 40 moves. It was Reshevsky's second defeat of the tournament. James T. Sherwin administering the other in the 10th round.
Scores of Reshevsky's and Fischer's last-round games are appended below.

* * *

Doc Quigg, a United Press staff writer, wrote the following interesting description of closing night in the National:
Robert James Fischer, Brooklyn's gift to international eggheadism, sat there in shirtsleeves, tieless, biting his dirty fingernails, chewing his tongue, twisting his lanky schoolboy legs against the chair rungs as his gray eyes swept up and down the chessboard.
A chess authority in the crowd of spectators whispered in awe, “If he wins the title, it will be the greatest miracle in all chess history.”
Across the narrow room, in another final-round game of the tournament for the coveted U.S. chess championship, sat the great Samuel Reshevsky, an international grandmaster and long regarded as one of the world's greatest players.

Snoring Banned
Reshevsky was a study in poise and confidence in a neat blue suit cigaret perched between two fingers, arms folded, eyes blinking behind brown-rim glasses, his bald and bulging head shining a bit in the fluorescent lighting. He sat beneath a portrait of himself, the only decoration on the gray walls of the tournament room of the 90-year-old Manhattan Chess Club.
On the archway entrance was pasted a penciled sign: “Spectators are requested not to snore in the tournament room.” This civilized way of yelling “Quiet!” was the only touch of humor as three nerve-wracking weeks of chess play reached climax. It was the first National Championship tournament in three years.
The 14 top players—including Bobby Fischer in his purple-striped shirt, brown corduroy pants, blue socks, and heavy shoes—each played the other once. Late in the evening there was a winner and new champ. Bobby Fischer. The miracle had happened. For Bobby is only 14.

Victory Unperturbed
Reshevsky finished in second place:
Out in the lobby, Maurice J. Kasper, club president, was saying: “It's fantastic. It's unbelievable. Never in the history of the world has a 14-year-old boy been playing, and winning, from masters and grandmasters.”
Bobby is a very quiet boy. His reaction at the moment of winning was typical. He looked at his mother and said, “Let's go home.”
Asked on the morning after his victory, “if he would care to be interviewed for the papers, he said, “Nah, can't talk to you today.” Did he think he would be able to talk some other day? “Nah, don't think so.”

Now Grandmaster
His voice is piping, hasn't changed yet. But the top of his forward-brushed towhead reaches about five feet nine. He has a long nose and thin, angular face and he plays chess with a pleasantly studied air, flicking his head to the right occasionally as if rejecting strategy ideas.
During the final round he gangled into an anteroom between moves and a chuckling admirer clutched his painfully thin shoulder and boomed: “Say, he's getting a little fat on 'um, hah?”
Bobby last summer won the U.S. Open Championship. With this new, and top, title he is eligible to be declared an international grandmaster and compete for the world championship, now held by Vassily Smyslov of Russia. Bobby used to cry when he lost a game but he doesn't any more. For about a year now he hasn't had much chance to cry.

* * *


St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Wednesday, January 22, 1958

Boy Chess Champ From Brooklyn

BROOKLYN, N.Y. Jan 22.

BOBBY FISCHER is a 14-year-old boy living in Brooklyn.
He is also chess champion of the United States and qualified, with famed Samuel Reshevsky, to represent the United States in the world championship interzonal tournament to be held in Europe next year.
Chess is associated in the public mind with two old codgers facing each other over the board, their equally stolid expressions broken only by Van Dyke beards and curving pipes.

Master Fischer is beardless—no oddity at his age—and doesn't smoke. But he can play chess. Early in the fall of 1957 Bobby upset more than 200 of the country's top-ranking players to win the United States open chess championship. Then earlier this month he capped his growing list of honors and became the United States champion, winning the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club of New York.

His brilliant play has won him the title of master, leading some wits to dub him Master Master Fischer. Learning the rudiments of the game from his sister Joan when he was six years old, Bobby spent the next seven years studying the game, playing with friends, and poking through foreign language chess books to absorb the moves of classic games. Two years ago he entered his first big tournament, the United States junior championship, and won in a breeze.
Not only in actual triumphs but in manner of play has Bobby earned the plaudits of the chess world, one of his victories bringing from the “Chess Review” the description as “The game of the century.”

The great concentration he shows in tournaments—at which he once used to burst into tears when he lost—is in sharp contrast to his restlessness in his high school classroom.
Told that Bobby sat for five hours at a chess tournament, one of his school teachers gasped, “In my class, Bobby couldn't sit still for five minutes.”

Said to be of generally superior intelligence by school authorities, Bobby is no better than an average student. His wakeful moments are for chess.
The problems of this sport are his problems, during meals, while watching television and at his bedside where there is a permanent chess board with pieces arranged.
Although these chess triumphs of her teen-age son are sources of pride to Mrs. Regina Fischer, she is not a forth-right adherent of the value of her son's singlemindeness on the subject.
“For four years,” she told one interviewer, “I tried everything I knew to discourage him. But it was hopeless.”
During his summer vacations, Bobby is to be found nightly at his “favorite hangout,” she continued, and “sometimes I have to go over there at midnight to haul him out of the place.”
The hangout: the ancient and dignified Manhattan Chess Club, “hangout” of numerous champions and chess masters.
Among the club's membership is international grand master Samuel Reshevsky, considered perhaps the finest player in the western world. But, in the recent tournament, the youngest American ever to be awarded the title of chess master, Bobby Fischer, edged grand master Reshevsky, with a score of 10½-2½ to 9½-3½.
The New York Herald Tribune Post-Dispatch Special Dispatch.


This article also appears in,

  • The Town Talk, Alexandria, Louisiana, Saturday, January 25, 1958 - Page 8

The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Saturday, January 25, 1958 - Page 7

Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn's 14-year-old triple crown chess champion, is learning to ski under the tutelage of Olympic competitor Toni Kastner — and in return is teaching Kastner to play chess. Many chess (not cheese) champs have been good athletes. Cuba's Jose Capablanca was a top tennis star and Russi's Boris Spassky clears six feet in the high jump.


Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, February 02, 1958 - Page 17

Side Glances
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old chess genius, recently won the title of United States Chess Champion by the amazing score of 10½-2½. He did not lose a single game, scoring eight wins and five draws. Grandmaster Reshevsky came in second.
Last year Bobby won the U.S. Junior title, the U.S. Open title and the New Jersey title. Better watch out, Mr. Smyslov, Bobby has his eye on the world title too!


Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, February 09, 1958 - Page 38

Fischer Ski Enthusiast
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old student, who recently won the United States open and closed championships, has become a ski enthusiast. He is taking lessons from Tony Kastner at the Grossinger Country Club. In return, the youngster is teaching the skiman how to play chess.


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, February 13, 1958 - Page 11

The following game can be said to be the decisive one in the recent U.S. championship. It enabled Bobby Fischer to go into the last round undefeated and a half-point ahead of Samuel Reshevsky. Fischer then needed only a draw to assure himself of at least a tie with Reshevsky for the title. The youngster got his draw but Reshevsky, needing a victory over William Lombardy to tie Fischer, was beaten.
Bobby's triumph in this game was achieved only after a terrific two-session struggle with Attilio DiCamillo, Philadelphia ace.


Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon, Sunday, February 16, 1958 - Page 11

Fischer Chess Champ At 14
NEW YORK (AP) —Bobby Fischer was a little slow in catching on to this game of chess. He didn't learn the moves until he was 6, and didn't start playing really seriously until he was 8.
So Saturday night, at the ripe old age of 14, he takes custody of the 22-year-old Frank J. Marshall trophy, emblematic of the United States open and closed championships. The award is to be made at the Marshall Chess Club, and Bobby is a little worried.
As part of the festivities he must play simultaneous matches with more than 20 rivals, and he is afraid they will last so long he won't be able to get an early start on his skiing at Grossinger's Sunday.
A thoroughly normal youngster, aside from his mastery of chess, is this 10th grader at Erasmus High School in Brooklyn who won top U.S. honors by winning eight games, drawing in five, and scoring 10½ of a possible 13 points in the national championships recently.


The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, March 30, 1958 - Page 41

By MERRILL DOWDEN
Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old Brooklyn prodigy who startled the chess world by winning both the United States open and closed championships in recent months, has made a deal with skimeister Tony Kastner at the Grossinger County Club, Grossinger, N.Y.
Fischer, who is just learning to ski, gets lessons from Kastner. In return, the youngster is teaching the skiman how to play chess. Bobby should be qualified. He has beaten just about everyone in sight.
“Bobby is an excellent student,” says Kastner. “He's extremely anxious to learn. Every morning I've found Bobby waiting for me when I came down to open the ski shop.”

No doubt many readers of this column got a good look at young Fischer last Wednesday night when he appeared on television to receive tickets to Russia, where he will play in the big tournaments of that chess-minded country.

Young prodigies are nothing new to chess. Paul Morphy of New Orleans, who later was to win the world championship, took a short match at the age of 12 from a master, J. Loewenthal. Samuel Reshevsky was famous at 6. Arturito Pomar won the championship of Spain at 15, and Jose Capablanca was champion of Cuba at 12.
Before playing this game, study the diagram. White has a move which helped win the first brilliancy prize at the Dublin International last year. Can you spot it?


The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, March 30, 1958 - Page 12

FOR COMPETITION
Youthful U.S. Champion In Chess to Meet Reds
NEW YORK, Mar. 29 (AP)—The United States' 15-year-old chess champion, Bobby Fischer, will get a shot at Russia's masters in the world championship tournament next summer.
A television show has given the gangling Brooklyn youngster a round-trip plane ticket to interzonal matches Aug. 5 through Sept. 15 at Potoroz, Yugoslavia. Russia may have at least six players in the event.
The other U.S. eligible, 46-year-old Samuel Reshevsky, may not be able to make trip because of lack of funds. The players' expenses are paid once they reach the tournament.
A world championship match currently is being played in Moscow between titleholder Mikhail Botvinnik, a former champion. It's progress is eagerly followed by Russian chess players and others around the world, estimated to number in the millions.
One point is awarded for winning a game and one half for a draw. The first player to score 12½ points wins the title and if the 24-game match game is played out on even terms the titleholder retains his championship.
Chess is virtually a national game in Russia. American players, counted only in thousands, are by comparison a mere handful.
The interzonal tournament is the second stage in a three-year cycle leading up to a world championship match. The first is qualifying competition in the various zones into which the international federation divides the chess world.
“The interzonal tournament is like the semifinals,” said Kenneth Harkness of the U.S. Chess Federation. “The top seven players in it, I think, qualify for the candidates tournament the next year. The winner of that is entitled to challenge the world champion.”
Asked why Russia should have six or more eligibles and the U.S. only tow, Harkness said: “It's logical. They have so many more players and more masters.”
About 20 or 30 or so players who have won the international title of Grand Masters are Russians. The five already eligible for places in the Potoroz tournament hold that title. The sixth Russian place will go to the loser of the current world title match.
Reshevsky also is a Grand Master. Young Fischer, a gangling 10th grade student at Brooklyn's Erasmus Hall High School, was rewarded for his amazing victories in the U.S. tournament with the title of International Master of chess.
Bobby, who hates to lose a chess game and who is regarded as probably the most remarkably young player ever developed in America, commented:
“They shoulda made me a Grand Master.”


Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola, Florida, Friday, April 11, 1958 - Page 28

NEW YORK (AP)—Russia is expected to have at least six chess players trying to qualify for a shot at the world championship in the interzonal tournament next summer. The United States may have none—because there isn't any money to send two qualified players to Yugoslavia.
A world championship match currently is being played in Moscow between titleholder Vasily Smyslov and challenger Mikhail Botvinnik, a former champion.
It's progress is eagerly followed by Russian chess players and others around the world, estimated to number in the millions.
Chess is virtually a national game in Russia. American players, counted only in thousands, are by comparison a mere handful.
Two Americans are eligible to compete in the interzonal matches at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, Aug. 5 to Sept. 15. They are Bobby Fischer, a 15-year-old wonder kid of chess from Brooklyn, and the 46-year-old, Polish-born veteran Samuel Reshevsky.
Whether they'll be able to go is another question. Spokesman at the Marshall Chess Club, where Bobby won the U.S. Open and closed championships this year, explained:
“The United States Federation is supposed to pay their transportation. Once they get over there, their living expenses will be paid. But the federation hardly had enough money to hold the championships here. It doesn't look as if they'll get enough to send them.”
The interzonal tournament is the second stage in a three-year cycle leading up to a world championship match. The first is qualifying competition in the various zones into which the international federation divides the chess world.


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, April 17, 1958 - Page 5

“Rome (UP)—A California artist today promised the 15-year-old chess champion a set of chessmen out of this world.
“Arthur Elliot, Rome portrait painter from Hollywood, said he received a letter from champion Bobby Fischer of 560 Lincoln pl., Brooklyn, N.Y., expressing interest in a set of space-age chess pieces Elliot designed.
“Elliot's chessmen are graceful, impressionistic representations of sputniks, space stations and missiles replacing queens, knights, pawns and other pieces on the chess board.
“I would very much like to have one of your space chess sets,' Bobby wrote Elliot, 'as a matter of fact, it actually does look rather “spacy.”'”
“The American artist said he would send a set to Bobby, whose only other hobby is science fiction.”


The Courier-News, Bridgewater, New Jersey, Saturday, May 10, 1958 - Page 6

3:30-4:30 (13) “Chess Match: U.S. champion Bobby Fischer challenges 13 chess players in simultaneous matches.”


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 25, 1958 - Page 73

Chess by Isaac Kashdan
Bobby Fischer, the new U.S. champion, and International Grandmaster Samuel Reshevsky are eligible to represent this country. Fischer is set to go, first visiting Russia, when he has been invited for exhibition matches.

[…]

FISCHER ON TELEVISION
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old American chess champion, gave a unique exhibition when he tackled 13 players simultaneously on television. He won 12 and drew one against Walter Harris, a 16-year-old member of the Marshall Chess Club in New York.
The games were played on WNTA, a new TV station in Newark, N.J. Sportscaster Bert Lee, who usually handles baseball games, gave the names and numbers of all the chess players.


Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, June 01, 1958 - Page 27

“When Bobby Fischer played simultaneous chess over the TV circuit a week ago, he won twelve out of thirteen games and drew the other. Here is the game he did not win. His opponent, Walter Harris is only 16 years old.”


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, June 01, 1958 - Page 37

CHESS by Isaac Kashdan

New Russian Prodigy
The Soviet Union unveiled its answer to America's 15-year-old chess champion. Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn. He is Ernest Kim, a 5-year-old prodigy who has been slaying the chess giants in his home town of Tashkent in Central Asia.
Fischer, when informed of the new Russian chess star, said, “If Botwinnik says Kim is good, you can believe it.” Fischer and Kim may meet this summer, as Bobby will spend a month in Russia on a special exhibition tour.


Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, June 08, 1958 - Page 59

Chess by G.E. Avery
Hartford Chess Club

Bobby Fischer to Russia
Bobby Fischer, the young United States Chess Champion, has received a gift of two round-trip airplane tickets to Russia, and will leave soon, and may play some of the Russian masters in June and July. This may include a match with Ernest Kim, a 5 year old chess prodigy. Later, from Aug. 5 to Sept. 15, he will take part in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
The other players entered in this tournament are Tahl, Petrosian, Bronstein and Averbach from Russia; Panno, Sanquinetti and Rossetto from Argentina; Fischer and Reshevsky from the United States; Pachman and Filip from Czechoslovakia; Benko and Szabo from Hungary; Matanovic and Gligoric from Yugoslavia; Olaffson of Iceland; Neikirch of Bulgaria; Vaitonia of Canada; Cardosa of the Philippines; and Larsen or Donner will represent the Netherlands.

[…]

Bobby Fischer's move as played against Sherwin in the last U.S. championship tournament…


Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Monday, June 23, 1958 - Page 11

Fischer to Have Master as Second
BELGRADE (AP) — U.S. Chess Champion Bobby Fischer will have a Yugoslav chess master as second in the international tournament in Portoroz, the second stage in three-leg cycle leading up to a world championship match.
The Yugoslav Chess Federation received a letter from Fischer's mother saying her son, 15, would be the only entry in the tournament without a second.
The federation decided to appoint a Yugoslav master to help Fischer during the tournament.


Eau Claire Leader, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Friday, June 27, 1958 - Page 8

U.S. Chess Champ
MOSCOW (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New Yorker who is the U.S. Chess champion, spent his first day in the Russian capital visiting the Moscow Central Chess Club with his sister, Joan.
Despite the language problem, Fischer visited with some of the Russian players who will be his opponents in coming matches here.


This article also appears in,

  • Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 7B
  • Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Arizona, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 9
  • Eau Claire Leader, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 10
  • Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 27

Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Arizona, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 32

Visa Woes Face Yank At Russ Chess Meet
MOSCOW (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old whiz of American chess, has had little trouble with the complicated maneuvering at Moscow's Central Chess Club, but he has become ensnarled in some of the Reds' red tape.
Bobby is the Brooklyn schoolboy who won the U.S. chess championship, then won passage to Europe on a TV program. And he hasn't done anything but play chess since he got here last Wednesday.

ONLY TROUBLE is Bobby wasn't due to show up until July 20, two weeks prior to his scheduled appearance in the opening interzonal chess championships in Yugoslavia Aug. 5-15.
The Russians footed the bill for the Moscow portion of the trip and made provisions for Bobby's two-week visa. But the kid, more interested in the inside of the usually hushed and solemn chess club than in seeing the sights, blew into town more than a month ahead of time.
Bobby wants to stay around until tournament time, but one Soviet official said this presents a very complicated problem, although Bobby is certainly welcome. The official explained gravely that it may be difficult to get the extension of Bobby's visa.

MEANWHILE, AS the chess club directors hold daily meetings aimed at unraveling the legal problem, Bobby keeps showing up daily to play chess, knocking off 30 games in three or four hours every morning before the officials turn him out to get some sunshine in the afternoons.
One official threw his hands up in the air Saturday, saying “We have to throw him out every afternoon. We don't know what to do with him. But he's a wonderful boy.”
Bobby said, “I like to play. I want to play against the best they've got. Their style gets me. That's why I came here.
Bobby said he'll take on anybody and complained that all his games so far have been quickies.
Club officials said Bobby has been winning about 60 per cent of his games, but they emphasized that the games have been completely informal with no time limit and no thought behind them.


The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 23

ARRIVES TOO EARLY
Young American Chess Whiz Hits Moscow Snag
MOSCOW, June 28 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old whiz kid of American chess, has had little trouble with the complicated maneuvering at Moscow's Central Chess Club but he has become ensnarled in some of the Reds' red tape.
Bobby is the Brooklyn schoolboy who won the U.S. chess championship, then won passage to Europe on a TV program. And he hasn't done anything but play chess since he got here last Wednesday. Only trouble is Bobby wasn't due to show up until July 20, two weeks prior to his scheduled appearance in the opening interzonal chess championships in Yugoslavia Aug. 5-15.
The Russians footed the bill for the Moscow portion of the trip and made provisions for Bobby's two-week visa. But the kid, more interested in the inside of the usually hushed and solemn chess club than in seeing the sights, blew into town more than a month ahead of time.

VISA PROBLEM
Bobby wants to stay around until tournament time, but one Soviet official said this presents a very complicated problem, although Bobby is certainly welcome. The official explained gravely that it may be difficult to get the extension of Bobby's visa.
Meanwhile, as the chess club directors hold daily meetings aimed at unraveling the legal problem, Bobby keeps showing up daily to play chess, knocking off 30 games in three or four hours every morning before the officials turn him out to get some sunshine in the afternoons.
One official threw his hands up in the air today, saying “We have to throw him out every afternoon. We don't know what to do with him. But he's a wonderful boy.”
Bobby said, “I like to play, I want to play against the best they have got. Their style gets me. That is why I came here.”
Bobby said he'll take on anybody and complained that all his games so far have been quickies.
Club officials said Bobby has been winning about 60 per cent of his games, but they emphasized that the games have been completely informal with no time limit and no thought behind them.
Bobby has lined up a friendly but relatively serious match with Tigran Petrosyan, a Soviet grandmaster for Monday afternoon, but as for meeting world champ Mikhail Botvinnik or former champ Vassily Smyslov, Bobby said, “You got to go through channels with these championship class players.”


Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, New York, Wednesday, July 02, 1958 - Page 29

Situation wanted: A postcard from Mrs. Regina Fischer, of Brooklyn, relates, “I am the mother of Bobby Fischer, age 15, the United States Chess Champion. He has just gone to Europe for the summer to represent the United States at chess events in Belgium, Russia, Yugoslavia and possibly other countries. I would like to go on TV to try to win about $2000 to get there and be with Bobby on his chess tour—or perhaps some publication or commercial organization might be interested.”


This article also appears in,

  • The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Thursday, July 10, 1958 - Page 22

The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Thursday, July 10, 1958 - Page 26

CHESS CHAMP ABROAD
BELGRADE, July 9. (AP) — U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn arrived here today to prepare for the World Chess Tournament in Portoroz, north Yugoslavia, Aug. 4. He plans to remain in Yugoslavia until then, playing against Yugoslav masters in warmup matches.


The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Sunday, July 13, 1958 - Page 64

U.S. Chess Wizard Visits Yugoslavia
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia, July 12. (UPI) — Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old touring American chess whiz, tied last night in a 37-move-game with Yugoslav international master Brasco Janosevic.
Fischer was invited here by the Yugoslav chess club, to meet Yugoslav chess masters and take part in a tournament from Aug. 5 to Sept. 10. He visited Moscow previously.
Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y. is accompanied on the trip by an older sister.


The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, Monday, July 14, 1958 - Page 10

Chess Wizards Draw
BELGRADE —(UPI)— American chess wizard Bobby Fischer's return game against the Yugoslav international master Janosevic ended in a draw in 44 moves Saturday. Fischer will play another two “Doubles” games before going on a tour of Slovenia.


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 24, 1958 - Page 6

Bobby Fischer, now in Europe, will not be on hand to defend the title he won last year but a strong field will be entered. First prize is $1000 and prize money will total $3250.

★ ★ ★

Fischer arrived in Yugoslavia on July 9 to prepare for the interzonal tournament starting there Aug. 4. He flew to Moscow June 25 in advance of the date Soviet officials expected him to arrive. Because of that fact there was no welcoming party to meet him, though a car was rushed out to the airport to pick him up after the Moscow Sports Committee heard he had landed.
During his stay in Russia on a two-week visa, Bobby did little but play chess, playing as many as 30 games in a morning. “We have to throw him out every afternoon,” said one official. “We don't know what to do with him. But he's a wonderful boy.”
Bobby was reported winning about 60 percent of his games and was meeting some of Moscow's best players, though not the very first-flighters and not in overly serious matches.
Incidentally, Bobby is paid a high tribute by Reuben Fine in the latter's newest book, “Lessons From My Games.” The veteran grand master writes, “He is the strongest 14-year-old in all chess history, better than Morphy, Capablanca, or Reshevsky at that age. He may well be a future world champion.”


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 31, 1958 - Page 14

“U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer won the tournament last year in competition with nine other masters and many players of lesser rank. While Bobby is not expected to enter this year, most of last year's other masters are expected to reappear, as well as several others including Saul Wachs, who recently won the State Rapid Transit Championship.


SPORTS WORLD
By Harold U. Ribalow

“What Price Child Prodigy?” Is the Question

Like violin prodigies, chess prodigies, too have their troubles. Sometimes, again like their musical counterparts, young chess masters do not develop the maturity of adults (Paul Morphy, the outstanding American chess genius, had mental troubles, and so did other grandmasters of the game). Without predicting the future, it is worth commenting on the complexities facing young Bobby Fischer, who at 14 is one of America's best chess players and one of the major 20 in the world.
Bobby recently starred in the United States title tournament, playing brilliantly, and winning a wonderful game from Arthur Bisguier, the defender. Yet no matter how well Fischer performs, his astounding capacity for chess bothers his mother and in a recent newspaper feature released by the North American Newspaper Alliance, the question is asked, “What price child prodigy?”
Here are some of the bits and pieces concerning Bobby Fischer which place him in focus as a personality and chess star—one more great Jewish master of the game: Hans Kmoch, general manager of the Manhattan Chess club, where Bobby plays a few evenings a week, says, “He's so great that he shows the same potential as the immortals Paul Morphy and Jose Capablanca. He may some day become a world champion.” Another member of the club is reported as asserting, “He's so sensitive that he used to go off and cry whenever he lost a game. He hates to lose and we sort of used to baby him around here. But he doesn't cry any more. He's growing up.”
“I've visited university guidance centers for gifted children,” his mother said. “Mostly they suggest I enroll him in a small private school, where he would get closer attention. But private schools are expensive.”
One of the teachers has placed herself on record by saying: “One thing I would suggest is that Bobby spend more time studying and less time at chess.” Paul Abramson, who also has written understandingly of Fischer, reports that Bobby plays chess while eating, keeps a board always near his bed to solve problems in chess. “It's chess, chess, chess from the minute he opens his eyes in the morning,” his mother remarks. And she reveals that Bobby owns 40 chess manuals, some in foreign languages which he has learned well enough to follow the moves. “He's not interested in anything else but chess. Where's his future? He doesn't even want to go to college.” And then, hopefully, “Maybe when he gets older he'll change, I want my Bobby to develop like other boys.”

The Boy Is Brilliant

Bobby thinks well of himself as a chess player, and no wonder. But he has the arrogance of the true master. When he was 13, he played Sammy Reshevsky (also a prodigy of his own time) and Reshevsky beat him with little effort. Still, Reshevsky remarked “that boy is brilliant; he'll go far.” And how did Fischer react to this? He was busy pointing out, to whoever would listen, where Reshevsky had made mistakes and how Reshevsky, if he had been better, would have won more quickly!
Altogether, Bobby has been playing the game for less than 8 years. When he was 6 his sister bought him a set, but he remained indifferent to the game until two years later when he saw Max Pavey, a master, playing 20 matches simultaneously at the Brooklyn Public Library. Bobby sat down at one of the boards and as soon as he made a few moves, Pavey concentrated on him. Finally, Pavey won, but after 15 minutes of hard thinking. A chess teacher named Carmen Nigro saw the game and offered to take Bobby under his wing. Soon Bobby's talents were obvious and in 1956 he won the national junior championship (he was the youngest winner in history) and tied for fourth in the U.S. Open. He was later invited to participate in the Lessing J. Rosenwald tournament and Bobby was the only player to win from Reshevsky. Hans Kmoch has said of this game, “I never saw any game played better. It was the game of the century.”
Bobby came in eighth, but won the brilliancy prize. Max Pavey came in behind Fischer.
When Bobby won the U.S open chess championship in Cleveland he beat the best American players, except for Reshevsky and Larry Evans, who did not compete. He now says it will take him ten years to become the chess champion of the world. This is a prize which comes to few masters, but Fischer is still young. He may make it. He may have problems now, and later. As a chess player, he is, however, a fascinating personality.


The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Friday, August 08, 1958 - Page 31

American Chess Player Tied For Second In Meet
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug. 7. —Soviet grand master Mikhail Talj today held the lead in the interzonal chess championships with the first two rounds completed.
Bobby Fischer of New York, 15-year-old international master of the United States, shared second place with Soviet grand master Tigrano Petrosyan, international master Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, and Paul Benkoe, Hungarian-born member of the U.S. Chess Federation.
The third round will be played tomorrow.
Standings after second round: Talj, 2 points; Fischer, Olafsson, Petrosyan and Benkoe 1½ points.


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 10, 1958 - Page 65

Chess by Isaac Kashdan
FISCHER, SHERWIN IN INTERZONAL CHESS

The Interzonal Tournament of the International Chess Federation started in Portoroz, Yugoslavia, with 21 players representing 12 countries, according to a report from the New York Times.
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old United States chess champion, made his international debut in a closely fought match with Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria. The encounter resulted in a creditable draw. Fischer had the white pieces.


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 14, 1958 - Page 38

Bobby Fischer isn't finding it all peaches and cream in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia. After four rounds he ia doing no better than a tie for 10th place in the 21-man field with a 2-2 score. He has lost to Pal Benko, Hungarian-American refugee, and drawn with Hector Rossetto, of Argentina, and Fridrik Olafsson, of Iceland.


The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Friday, August 15, 1958 - Page 7

“Even the youthful Bobby Fischer, who only a few minutes before was mated by Benko and was on the verge of crying, found here some consolation for his misery and started to laugh.
As for the youngest player, the much advertised American Bobby Fischer, his chess so far has been disappointing. Although he has played the weakest opposition—if one is permitted to talk about “weakness” at this tournament—he has scored only one win and that from a lost position against Fuster, who, pressed by time, made a terrible blunder.


The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Friday, August 15, 1958 - Page 29

Youth Draws Bronstein in Chess Match
POROTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug. 14 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old international master from New York, drew against the famous Soviet grand master David Bronstein after 59 moves in the international chess tournament today.
The more experienced Soviet master tried without success to crush Fischer, who defended himself excellently.
After six complete rounds, Iceland's international master Fridrick Olaafson and Soviet grand master Tigran Petrosyan led 19 other world ranking players. Each had 4.5 points. Fischer was down the list with 2.5 points.
Paul Benko, Hungarian refugee now a member of the U.S. Chess Federation, defeated Soviet grand master Yuriy Averbach. Benko, considered the biggest surprise of the tournament, still has to play his adjourned fifth round match with Bronstein.
James Sherwin, U.S. international master, surrendered to grand master Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia after 66 moves in their fifth round adjourned match.


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 52

“One of Benko's wins is the first loss sustained by Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old U.S. chess champion. Bobby has a 2-2 score, including a win against Geza Fuster of Canada, and draws with Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria and Hector Rossetto of Argentina.
A report from Yugoslavia indicates Fischer is having difficulties with fans and newsmen, who are naturally attracted to the chess prodigy. He has requested help from the authorities, stating that he can not concentrate on his game with a crowd around his table.


Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 34

A Bashful Chess Whiz's Exit Fizzes
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug. 16 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, United States wonder kid, Saturday won his match against the Danish grand master, Bent Larsen, at the International chess tournament.
The 15 year old American international chess master received strong applause after his success.
The publicity shy boy tried to escape from the big tournament hall by a side way. But he was caught by hundreds of chess fans who wanted his autograph.
Fischer's performance Saturday was considered the best in his short international career.
Playing White against Larsen, who used a Sicilian defense, the Brooklyn high school lad boldly sacrificed a pawn and quality in order to get more room for his well planned attack.
Larsen gave up after 30 moves.


The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Wednesday, August 20, 1958 - Page 20

Other Sports
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old chess champion from Brooklyn, defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina in the ninth round of the interzonal chess tournament at Yugoslavia.


The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Wednesday, August 20, 1958 - Page 19

Fischer Wins Match
Yugoslavia, Aug. 19 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old chess champion from Brooklyn, today defeated Raul Sanguinetti, of Argentina, in the ninth round of the interzonal chess tournament.


The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, Wednesday, August 20, 1958 - Page 15

Wins Chess Match
YUGOSLAVIA— (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15 year old chess champion from Brooklyn Tuesday defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina in the ninth round of the Interzonal Chess Tournament.


The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Thursday, August 21, 1958 - Page 10

Young Chess Wizard Trails Soviet Player
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, August 20 (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New York chess wizard, drew with the young Argentinian grand master, Oscar Panno in the interzonal chess tournament today. But the youthful American still trailed pace setting Mikhail Talj of Russia by 1.5 points.
Bobby and Panno drew after 21 movies in a Sicilian defense game.
Hungarian refugee Paul Benko, now a member of the U.S. Chess Federation, drew with Iceland's Fridrik Olafsson.
James Sherwin of the U.S. also played a draw with Bulgaria's Oleg Neikirkh. Their match ended after 24 hours.
After 10 rounds of the 21-round tournament, Talj led the field with seven points. Benkoe had six with one adjourned match. Fischer had 5.5 points, Sherwin was far down with two points and one adjourned match.


The Kansas City Times, Kansas City, Missouri, Thursday, August 21, 1958 - Page 27

DRAW FOR CHESS WIZARD.
Bobby Fischer Is Held Even by Oscar Panno.
Porotoroz, Yugoslavia, Aug. 20. (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New York chess wizard, drew with the young Argentinian grand master, Oscar Panno, in the interzonal chess tournament today. But the youthful American still trailed pace setting Mikhail Talj of Russia by 1.5 points.


Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Saturday, August 23, 1958 - Page 28

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, a chess whiz kid, and Fridrick Olafsson of Iceland, adjourned their match Friday in Portoraz, Yugoslavia…


This article also appears in,

  • Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 53
  • The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 13
  • The Monitor, McAllen, Texas, Thursday, January 16, 1958 - Page 4
  • Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 12

Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 7

Yank Youth, Soviet Halt Chess Match
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, August 23 (AP) — Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York and Russian champion Mikhail Tal tangled in one of the most exciting matches of the interzone chess tournament Saturday without reaching a decision. Their 12th round match was adjourned by Fischer.
For a long time the position was balanced and both masters played for victory. At one time Fischer had a draw but he didn't want it. Experts, however, believe the young American should have contented himself with a draw and believe that now Fischer will have to fight for draw.
The Soviet masters are known for excellent domestic analysis of adjourned matches. They have several seconds who do the job for them. Fischer also has a second but he is away attending the chess federation congress and Bobby will have to do his own analyzing.
Hungarian refugee Paul Benkoe, playing for the U.S. Chess Federation, drew with Soviet master Tigran Petrosyan after 21 moves.
James Sherwin of the U.S. and Hector Rossetto of Argentina also played an adjourned match with the probability it will end in a draw.


Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Monday, August 25, 1958 - Page 7

New Yorker, 15, Defeats Soviet Chess Champion
POROTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New York chess wizard, marked up another victory in the interzonal tournament Sunday when he defeated Soviet Champion Mikhail Talj in an adjourned 15th round match.
Fischer, who declined yesterday to play for a draw, was not in a good position at the start of today's play. But he forced the play and came through with a victory.
The youthful New Yorker, however, had to give up in his 11th round adjourned match with Iceland's Fridrik Olafsson after 44 moves.
James Sherwin, U.S. international master who got off to a bad start in the tournament, chalked up his third straight victory. He defeated Argentine Hestor Rossetto after 45 moves in their 12th round adjourned game.
After the 12th round, Russian players continued to dominate play. Tigran Petrosyan held first place with nine points. Fischer trailed far down with six, a half-point back of Paul Benkoe, Hungarian refugee playing for the U.S. Chess Federation. Sherwin had five points.


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 43

“U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old schoolboy from Brooklyn, earned 2 points of his four games last week to maintain his plus score in the tournament. He defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina in the ninth round in a 28-move Sicilian Defense.
In the 10th round Fischer drew against Oscar Panno of Argentina. The boy then suffered his second loss to Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in a difficult ending in which time pressure was an important factor. Fischer then succeeded in drawing with Tal after the Russian obtained an early advantage.

FISCHER IN BELGRADE
Bobby Fischer spent several weeks in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, before the start of the Interzonal Tournament. During that period he engaged in two practice matches with Yugoslavia masters.
Fischer defeated Matulovic by 2½-1½. Against Janosevic, the result was two draws. One of the latter games follows. It was an exciting battle in which each contestant missed opportunities.


The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 3

PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP) —Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York improved his chances of qualifying for the world chess championship yesterday when he defeated Columbia's Boris De Greff in a 15th round interzonal tournament match.
The top six in the interzonal play qualify for the world tournament. Fischer, picking up a full point, has 7.5 points with one adjourned match to be completed and six more rounds to go.
Two Soviet masters, Mikhail Talj and Tigran Petrosyan, lead with 10.5 points.
Fischer played boldly against De Greff and forced the Columbian to give up in the 35th move.


Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 28

U.S. Chess Star Wins Tourney Trial Match
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug 30. (AP)—Fifteen year old Bobby Fischer of New York Saturday improved his chances of qualifying for the world chess tournament when he defeated Columbia's Boris De Greff in a 15th round interzonal tournament match.
The top six in the interzonal play qualify for the world meet. Fischer, picking up a full point, has 7.5 points with one adjourned match to be completed and six more rounds to go.
Two soviet masters, Mikhail Talj and Tigran Petrosyan, lead with 10.5 points
James Sherwin of New York was defeated by David Bronstein, soviet grand master.


This article also appears in:

  • Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 16

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 18

Fischer Gains on Chess Leaders
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia—(AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old United States chess champion from New York, Monday joined the group of favorites at the Interzonal Chess Tournament played in the framework of world chess championship.
Fischer defeated international master James Sherwin of New York in the twice adjourned match from the 14th round. After three hours play and after 90 moves Fischer came through with the victory.
With nine points out of 16 matches Fischer joined the “Grand Master's Group” and is at present sharing the fifth place with such prominent grand masters as David Bronstein of Russia and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia.


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  • The Salem News, Salem, Ohio, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 4
  • The Marion Star, Marion, Ohio, Friday, August 29, 1958 - Page 6

The Evening Review, East Liverpool, Ohio, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 4

Atonement
Paradoxically, it is the atheistic, royalty-hating Russian Communists who dominate the one activity dealing with symbolic kings, queens and bishops.
This activity is chess.
There may be some question about whether the United States or Russia is ahead in the space race and the cold war, but in world chess competition the Russians have been tops for years. One reason is that the Russian government makes wards of its best chess players, freeing them from the necessity of earning a living.
But this year the United States came up with a chess sensation of its own—15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y., who won the U.S. championship.
Young Bobby and James Sherwin, U.S. international master, have been busy with international tournaments, matching their chess knowledge against the Russians and others.
Their fellow Americans wish Bobby and Sherwin well in this cold war of wits. Who knows, in years to come, Bobby might yet wrest the world championship for our country and atone for Sputnik.


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 04, 1958 - Page 38

“Bobby Fischer continues to make headlines at Portoroz, although the Soviet grandmasters still are dominating the standings in the interzonal tournament. … Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, who defeated Fischer in the 11th round, was third at 10-6. … Then in a tie for sixth place at 9-6 came five other players, including Fischer. … In the 13th round Fischer drew with Petrosian in a difficult rook and pawn ending. Then in the 14th round, in his longest game of the tournament, the 15-year-old Brooklyn phenomenon defeated fellow American James T. Sherwin of New York in another rook and pawn ending. This game went three sessions before a decision was arrived at. Observers said Sherwin had at least a theoretical draw, but missed it. Two specimens of Bobby Fischer's play in the interzonal are given below.


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 7

Fischer's Qualification Hinges on Final Round

Whether Bobby Fischer qualifies for the challengers' chess tournament next year hinges on the 20th and final round results in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, which should be completed today.
With one game to finish, the 15-year-old United States champion was tied with David Bronstein, of Russia, for fifth place in the standings. Each of them had a score of 11½-7½. It seemed likely that Bobby will be one of the six qualifiers, but not certain, since four other players were close behind at 11-8 each.
[…]
In this game, however, Fischer appeared to have a clear-cut advantage when Larsen resigned.


Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 41

Russian Wins Chess Tourney
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, (AP)—Mikhail Tal of Russia tonight emerged as the number one player in the international chess tournament.
The Soviet champion drew with International Master James Sherwin in a last round game tonight to finish the tournament with 13.5 points.
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old American chess champion from New York, drew with Yugoslav Grand Master Svetozar Grigovic. That result let Grigovic in a firm second place in the final standings with 13 points, while Fischer held fifth place—at least temporarily—with a final score of 12 points.
Fischer's final position will be determined by the outcome of matches not finished tonight, and adjourned until tomorrow.
But he seemed almost assured of participation in next year's “tournament of candidates.”
The players who finish in the first six places will enter the “tournament of candidates” at a still to be specified site next year.
The winner of the “tournament of candidates” gets to challenge World Champion Michael Botvinnik of Russia, in 1960.


The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 27

Russian Is Top Man in Chess Meet
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Sept. 10 (AP)—Mikhail Tal of Russia tonight emerged as the number one player in the international chess tournament.
The Soviet champion drew with international master James Sherwin in a last round game tonight to finish the tournament with 13.5 points.
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old American chess champion from New York, drew with Yugoslav grand master Svetozar Grigovic. That result left Grigovic in a firm second place in the final standings with 13 points, while Fischer held fifth place—at least temporarily—with a final score of 12 points.
Fischer's final position will be determined by the outcome of matches not finished tonight, and adjourned until tomorrow.
But he seemed almost assured of participation in next year's “tournament of candidates.”
The players who finish in the first six places will enter the “tournament of candidates” at a still to be specified site next year.
The winner of the “tournament of candidates” gets to challenge world champion Michael Botvinnik, of Russia, in 1960.


This article also appears in,

  • The Courier-News, Bridgewater, New Jersey, Saturday, December 27, 1958 - Page 5
  • The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 14
  • The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 29
  • The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 15
  • Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 36

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 26

BOBBY FISCHER YOUNGEST CHESS GRAND MASTER AT 15
PORTOROZ, Yugloslavia, Sept. 12 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old United States champion, became a chess grand master yesterday, the youngest ever to hold this title in chess history.
Fischer placed fifth at the interzonal chess tournament in Portoroz and thus automatically received the title of grand master. Young Fischer had come to Europe to compete for the first time in his life at an interzonal tournament.
He qualified for next year's tournament of candidates, the winner of which plays for the world championship with the present titleholder. Soviet Grand master Mikhail Botvinnik, in 1960.
Fischer drew against all Soviet grand masters represented at the Protoroz tournament. Out of a possible 20 points, he collected 12, which in the tough competition of some of the best world chess players is considered an extremely good result.


This article also appears in,

  • Stevens Point Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 7
  • Marshfield News-Herald, Marshfield, Wisconsin, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 10
  • The Austin Daily Herald, Austin, Minnesota, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 8

The Berkshire Eagle, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 12

Bobby Fischer, 15, Chess Grand Master
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn wonder kid, has the distinction today of being the youngest Grand Master in the long history of chess.
Bobby achieved the title Thursday night when he wound up fifth in the six-week international chess tournament set up to determine six potential challengers for the world title.


The Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Indiana, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 19

CHESS
Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn wonder kid, attained the distinction of being the youngest Grand Master in the long history of the game by winding up fifth in a six-week tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, to determine six challengers for the world title held by Mikhail Botvinik of Russia.


The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 13


This article also appears in the following:

  • The Gazette and Daily, York, Pennsylvania, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 4

The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 4

BRILLIANT SUCCESS
U.S. Chess Whiz, 15, Is Made Grand Master

PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Sept. 11 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old United States chess champion, became a chess grand master today, the youngest ever to hold this title in chess history.
Fischer placed fifth at the interzonal chess tournament here played in framework of world championship competition and thus automatically received the title of grand master.
This marked a brilliant success for Fischer, who came to Europe to compete for the first time in his life at an international chess championship tournament.
He qualified also for the next year's tournament of candidates, the winner of which plays for the world championship with present world champion Soviet grand master Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960.
The young American grand master of the interzonal chess tournament played very successfully. He drew against all Soviet grand masters represented here. From 20 possible points he collected 12 which in the tough competition of best world chess players is considered an extremely good result.
Hungarian refugee Paul Benko, a member of the U.S. Chess Federation, shares third with Soviet Grand Master Tigran Petrosyan. Benko, too, became a grand master.
Benko left Hungary after 1956 in his homeland. Hungarian refugees contributed to enable him to come to Portoroz. He, too, will enter the tournament of candidates.
Both Fischer and Benko will be the strongest entries for the candidates tournament from the West. Their likely opponents will be Paul Keres and Vasili Smislov, who placed first and second at the last candidates tournament and the first to sixth placed at Portoroz, among them Soviet grand masters Mikhal Talj and Tigran Petrosyan, and Yugoslav grand master Svetozar Gligoric. The eighth entry has not yet been decided and depends on the outcome of the tournament here, which will end tonight.


The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 2

PORTOROZ CHESS TOURNAMENT ENDS
Benko, Fischer, and Olafsson qualify
From a Chess Correspondent

POROTOROZ, SEPTEMBER 11.
The third interzonal chess tournament ended here to-night. The six players who are to compete at the next candidates' tournament, the winner of which will challenge the world champion Botvinnik, are Tal, Gligoric, Petrosian, Benko, Fischer and Olafsson.
Until the last move there was a possibility that six people could share the sixth place if Olafsson drew against de Greiff in his last game before the curtain fell. However, the Icelander concluded six weeks of hard fight by beautifully mating the Columbian master in the fifty-third move.
In the most dramatic last round, played the night before in such a furious thunderstorm that the lights went off for a while and all telephone lines were cut, the outsider Cardoso, only third from the bottom, produced the biggest sensation of the whole tournament, be beating grandmaster Bronstein who went through twenty previous rounds as the only unbeaten competitor.
Bronstein was thus deprived of the opportunity to appear in the third candidates' tournament but the American champion, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer, took his chance to make chess history. He both qualified for the candidates' tournament and became the youngest grandmaster ever.

Fierce struggle
Fischer drew with Gligoric after a fierce struggle in which the Yugoslav champion tried very hard to win and to catch the leader Tal at the last bend. Tal drew with Sherwin and was congratulated by all other participants as a truly deserving winner. The other prospective candidates for the winning sector, Szabo and Pachman, could only draw with Panno and Sanguinetti respectively and were caught by Matanovic, who beat Larsen.
To win this tournament which will undoubtedly rate as one of the sharpest and most dynamic in chess history Tal won eight games, drew eleven, and lost one, Gligoric had the same number of wins but lost one more game. Of the other winners, Petrosian won six, drew thirteen, and lost one: Benko won seven, drew twelve, and lost two: Fischer won six, drew twelve, and lost two: and Olafsson won eight, drew eight, and lost four.
The final position was:

Tal (USSR) 13½, Gligoric (Yugoslavia) 13, Benko (stateless) and Petrosian (USSR) 12½, Fischer (USA) and Olafsson (Iceland) 12, Averbakh (USSR) and Bronstein (USSR) 11½, Matanovic (Yugoslavia), Pachman (Czechoslovakia), Szabo (Hungary), Filip (Czechoslovakia), and Panno (Argentina) 11, Sanguinetti (Argentina) 10, Neikirch (Bulgaria) 9½, Larsen (Denmark) 8½, Sherwin (USA) 7½ Rossetto (Argentina) 7, Cardoso (Philippines) 6, de Greiff (Columbia) 4½, Fuster (Canada) 2.

Nordic game
Not all the best games in the tournament were played by the Russians, who rather tended to dominate it. In the following Nordic game the Danish player Larsen was White and Olafsson, the Icelander, Black.


This article also appears in,

  • Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 16
  • The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 44
  • Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 24
  • The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 74
  • The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 33

The Springfield News-Leader, Springfield, Missouri, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 25

American Is Youngest Chess Grand Master
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old U.S. chess champion, became a chess grand master Thursday, the youngest ever to hold this title in chess history.
Fischer placed fifth at the Interzonal Chess Tournament here, played in framework of world championship competition, and thus automatically received the title of grand master.
This marked a brilliant success for Fischer, who came to Europe to compete for the first time in his life at an international chess tournament.


The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 88

Whiz Kid at Chessboard
But Bobby, 15, Finds Books Baffling

New York Times Service
NEW YORK, Sept. 13—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn boy who this week moved into the top rank of world chess players, has headed home for what may be even more difficult brain work.
Bobby, who excels in the things he likes and has difficulty with those he doesn't, missed the first week of his junior year at Erasmus High School in Brooklyn because he was playing in an international tournament in Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
HE TIED FOR fifth place, qualifying for a part in next year's challenger's tournament to decide who will meet Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia in 1960 for the world title. His performance made him the youngest person ever to qualify as an international grand master.
Bobby's mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, had expected him home in time to start school Monday. But Saturday learned he had been unable to get a seat on a plane and would be delayed several more days.
HIS PRINCIPAL, Miss Grace Corey said he wouldn't be subject to any disciplinary action for his late arrival at school — “But it will be very difficult to make up the work he lost.”
In the past, Bobby has had difficulties with school work, even while moving up in the ranks of chess players to capture first the United States Open chess tournament and then the U.S. chess championship.

But last year, despite an intensive schedule, he settled down and scored 97 in mathematics, 90 in Spanish and 80 in biology examinations.

This year, though his principal said he would be carrying five courses — English, Spanish, intermediate algebra, world history and physical chemistry.


Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Monday, September 15, 1958 - Page 55

Young Chess Grand Master Goes To Zurich
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia, Sept. 14 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, world's youngest chess grand master, left Yugoslavia Sunday night to join his sister in Zurich, Switzerland.
Fischer became chess grand master at the age of 15, a record unbeaten in chess history. He placed among the first six in the International chess tournament which ended last Thursday.
The young American next will participate at the Tournament of Candidates in 1959—the last stage in the world chess championship competition.


This article also appears in,

  • Daily Press, Newport News, Virginia, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 10

The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 19

American Chess Ace, 15, Returns To Books
New York, Sept. 15 (AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, the only American to qualify for next year's World Challengers' Chess tournament, arrived by plane today for a bout with his high school books.
Fischer tied for fith place in the Inter-Zonal World Chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, to qualify for the Challengers' tourney in 1959. If he wins that one, he will be entitled to play Soviet World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik for the world title in 1960.
The youth, a junior at Erasmus High School in Brooklyn, was met at Idlewild Airport by his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer.
Fischer, the youngest person to ever qualify for the Challenger's tournament, was asked if he thought he could beat Botvinnik. He shrugged noncommittally.


This article also appears in,

  • Star-Gazette, Elmira, New York, Wednesday, September 17, 1958 - Page 18

The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 1

Has Eye on World Title—Yankee Chess Whiz-Kid Begins His Training a Year in Advance
BROOKLYN (AP)—If a boxer began training for a championship fight a year in advance of the battle, you'd wonder if he was kidding.
But chess players … ah, that's different.

BOBBY FISCHER, the 15-year-old whiz-kid of world chess—he's youngest international grand master ever—went back to Erasmus Hall High School in Flatbush Tuesday, but he was mentally figuring out his strategy for next year's challenger's tournament.
In that one, he could wind up challenging Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia, the current ruler, for the world championship.
When he showed up in Europe for the candidates' tournament—sort of an elimination for the challengers' event—he wasn't taken very seriously. Still he wound up in the top six in the competition in Portoroz, Yugoslavia.

I LEARNED a few tricks,” he said, “and I can't wait a minute to get started with my practice.”
He arrived home Monday and within 10 minutes he had sat down at a chess table. In a few more minutes he had his opponent, Norman Monath, beaten. Monath is an editor who is helping Bobby write a book on chess.
“You know,” said Bobby, “when I arrived in Yugoslavia, all the international players told me they would beat me. Actually, I lost two games. I should have won them all.

BOBBY SAID that there is much more interest in chess outside the United States than there is here.
“Why,” he said, “I had to sign hundreds of autographs. Abroad everyone knows about chess. It is considered an art.”
Bobby's mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, was worried that the lad would not have the money to come home. But his fifth-place in the tournament provided him with about $340 and that made it easy.

WELL, IT'LL BE hard, but a few hours a day while he's cracking the books in English, history and the like, he'll forget about chess.
But if he could only get that Botvinnik …


The Austin Daily Herald, Austin, Minnesota, Wednesday, September 17, 1958 - Page 15

BACK TO SCHOOL——Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old chess whiz, leaves a plane at Idle-wild airport in New York after a flight from Brussels. Bobby, heading back to school in Brooklyn, wound up in the top six in the international competition in Yugoslavia. (AP Photofax).


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 32

Chess With Sam Laird
Fine Playing of Youth Big Story of Week

Bobby Fischer's fine showing at Portoroz, in qualifying for the challengers' tournament next year and becoming the youngest international grand master in history, of course was the big story of the chess world during the past week.
The 15-year-old United States champion tied for fifth place among the 21 players in the interzonal with Fridrick Olagsson, of Iceland, one of the two who won a game from him. Soviet champion Mikhail Tal finished first, followed by Svetozar Gligoric, of Yugoslavia, Hungarian refugee Pal Benko (now a resident of Cleveland and a U.S Chess Federation member) and Tigran Petrosian, of Russia, in that order to make up, with Fischer and Olafsson, the six qualifiers for next year.
Fischer finished with 12 out of a possible 20 points by scoring six victories, drawing 12 games, and losing twice. Benko was the only player besides Olafsson to defeat him. He drew with all four of the Russians, an earlier report that he beat Tal proving erroneous.
During his visit to Russia and the Portoroz tournament Bobby did not get to play either ex-world champion Vassily Smyslov or Paul Keres, who are perhaps the Soviet's strongest players except for world champion Mikhail Botvinnik. Keres and Smyslov, who finished one-two in the last challenger's event, will be seeded into competition in next year's tourney and Bobby will get his chance to play them then. The winner of the tournament will met Botvinnik in 1960 for the world's title.
It is unnecessary to elaborate on Fischer's remarkable showing at Portoroz. He fully lived up to all his previous promise in his first trip abroad and his first tournament where the competition was so stiff. He has “convinced” European observers who at first tended to underrate him, saying “After all, he's only 15.” If his game continues to improve in the next two years as it has in the last two, Botvinnik's crown rests uneasily indeed upon his head today.
Bobby now has returned home and resumed his studies as a junior at Erasmus Hall High School, Brooklyn. Last week there were reports that he was stranded in Yugoslavia for lack of funds to return home, but the $340 prize money he won was more than ample for plane fare back. He is writing a book on chess that is due to be published next year.
He says the thing he liked best at Portoroz was getting an even score with the four Russian grand masters — Tal, Petrosian, Bronstein and Auerbach. The thing he liked least was having to sign hundreds of autographs. He also says he should have won the two games he lost.
One of his games and another from the tournament are appended.


The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 10

Bobby and Eddie
There was no Broadway ticker-tape welcome to Bobby Fischer when he returned from Europe the other day. No crowd was on hand to greet him when his plane put down at Idlewild. His arrival went unnoticed in the gossip columns.
Eddie Fisher spells his name without “c”. In the days before Bobby came home with barely enough money in his pocket to buy a sandwich, Eddie was getting scads of publicity. His every move was watched closely in New York and Hollywood. Eddie, a singer, was in something of a jam.
Bobby Fischer, you see, is only a chess player. At 15 he achieved in Europe the distinction of being one of six persons in the world to be recognized as masters in this age-old game of kings and queens, of knights, bishops, castles and pawns. They say it takes brains to play chess, even an ordinary game. Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer is proficient to an extraordinary degree.
Eddie Fisher, the singer, his wife Debbie Reynolds and Liz Taylor, relict of Mike Todd, have been linked in the sensational news of the day. It's one of those New York-Hollywood triangles. Some of Eddie's admirers are fearful. He was hissed the other night on the Steve Allen show.
Bobby Fischer has brains. He is one of the world's best chess players. May become champion some day. Using chess terms, he might say that Eddie is a knight in tarnished armor who moved out of his castle to become the pawn of a designing queen.


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 61

FISCHER PLACES, MADE GRANDMASTER
In a tense last-round battle at the Interzonal Chess Tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn drew with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia. The youthful U.S. chess champion finished in a tie for fifth place, sufficient to qualify for the Challengers Tournament next year, according to a report from the New York Times.
Fischer, with the black pieces, elected to play a variation of the Sicilian Defense which is considered inferior. Gilgoric sacrificed a piece for strong attacking chances. Bobby held firmly, however, and after 32 moves a draw was agreed.
Brilliantly successful in his first international tournament, Fischer scored 12-8, winning six games, drawing 12 and losing only to Fridrick Olafsson of Iceland, with whom he tied in the standings, and to Paul Benko, former Hungarian champion, now a U.S. resident.
As a result of his score in this top-flight competition, Fischer became an international grandmaster. The announcement was made at the Stockholm headquarters of the International Chess Federation. Fischer is the youngest player ever to receive this rank.


The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 42

FISCHER QUALIFIES
Young Bobby Fischer lived up to the advanced billing by becoming the youngest player ever to reach the rank of International Grandmaster by virtue of his qualifying for next year's World's Candidates Tournament. Fischer finished strong to tie for fifth place, and claim one of the first sixth places in the Potoroz Interzonal tournament just concluded. Fischer, who only last year said, “They shoulda made me a Grandmaster,” when informed of his elevation to the rank of International Master, did an about face this time, commenting “It's nice to be a Grandmaster, but it won't help me play any better.” Fischer has returned to the U.S. where he is a junior in Brooklyn's Erasmus High School, and by his own admission, “just an average student.”


Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 38

“Bobby Fischer is now in Brooklyn, having had wonderful experience in the tournament at Potoroz, Yugoslavia. He received a prize for fifth place. He has won from Fuster, Sanguinetti, and Larsen; tied with Neikirch, Rosetto, Bronstein, Auerbach, Panno, Tal and Petrosian, the latter two being leading Russian players; and lost to Benko and Olaffson.


Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 74

“Bobby Fischer, the Brooklyn wonder boy of chess, has been awarded the title of international grandmaster. The 15-year-old prodigy is the youngest player to whom the honor has ever been given.
He won the award as a result of his brilliant performance in the Interzonal Tournament held recently in Yugoslavia in which 21 of the world's best players competed. Fischer finished in a tie for fifth place, thus qualifying for next year's Candidates tournament.”


The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Monday, September 22, 1958 - Page 6

Sputnik From Brooklyn
Chess has been called the national game of Russia, where everybody seems to play it. Big school and community tournaments are held. Important national tournaments are played in opera houses to overflow crowds while the moves are relayed by loudspeaker to standees in the streets. Since the death in 1946 of Alexander Alekhine, himself an expatriate Russian, the world champion has been a citizen of the USSR. And in each championship match during that period, both contestants have been Russians.
No one would pretend that chess is the national game of the United States. This country has had quite a few international grandmasters, over the years, who ranked among the first 10 in the world, but not one of them ever won a world title. Emmanuel Lasker of Germany did come to live in the United States while he was still world champion, and so did Jose Raoul Capablanca of Cuba. Subsequently Samuel Reshevsky, the erstwhile boy prodigy from Poland, became United States champion and almost, but not quite, qualified to play the champion for the world title.
So it is that 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the most remarkable young player this country has produced since Morphy, may never become a national hero like Elvis Presley. But he is our best prospect to bring to the United States the first world championship ever won by a native American.
Bobby is a tournament-seasoned veteran, who has been playing in national championships for years. He is now United States champion, replacing Reshevsky. He is also a recognized “international grandmaster,” as of this summer —the youngest player of any nation ever to achieve that status.
How he won it is a story in itself. A while back Bobby won a little money on a TV show. He decided to use it to pay his fare to Portoroz, Yugoslavia, and enter the international Candidates Chess Tournament there. Where he was going to get the money to pay his fare back he didn't know. But he got it—as prize money for finishing fifth.
The Candidates Tournament is a high rung on the ladder to the world championship. The six who finished highest in it—and that included Bobby—qualify to play in a special six-man invitational tournament next year. The winner of that gets a shot at the world title by playing a subsequent 24-game match in Russia with Champion Botvinnik. It is an interesting fact that Bobby, though he lost two games in Yugoslavia, was undefeated by any of the Russian candidates.
Nobody thinks that Bobby could beat the champ today, but we can't recall any 15-year-old in chess history who was even thought of as a contender for the world title. Already a tournament veteran, Bobby has been improving steadily, and by the time he faces the champ—as by present indications he will, sooner or later—he may well have improved enough to beat him.
If he can do that, he will deserve to be addressed as the American Sputnik. If chess is the Russian national game, we defy Nikita S. Khrushchev to name any 15-year-old Russian boy who is considered a likely prospect to come to the United States and smash Babe Ruth's home run record.


This article also appears in,

  • Star-Gazette, Elmira, New York, Friday, September 19, 1958 - Page 6

The Ithaca Journal, Ithaca, New York, Tuesday, September 23, 1958 - Page 6

Chess Master at 15
The average person who plays (or plays at) chess must stand in awe of 15-year-old Bobby Fischer.
Bobby, a Brooklyn high school junior, playing in the International Chess Tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, tied for fifth place. Being among the top six players gives him the rank of an international grand master and puts him in line to compete for the world championship next year.
There are only about 40 active chess players in the world in Bobby Fischer's class. Someone has compared his with a Little Leaguer who pitches 20 winning games in the majors.
Bobby is another teen-ager who has done remarkable things.


The Age, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Tuesday, September 30, 1958 - Page 12
By “The Age” Correspondent in New York

Chess Wonder Boy of U.S.
When Bobby Fischer was six year old, his sister Joan went out to the local candy store in Brooklyn and bought a chess board.
Since Bobby was too young to read, Joan — then aged 11 — studied the instructions and explained the moves to her brother.
Soon, as children do, she lost interest in the game.
But Bobby became obsessed by it and now, at the age of 15, is not only junior champion of the United States, but the youngest international chess grand master in the world.
His victory at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, recently, qualifies him to be cone of the six who will compete against one another to play the world champion — Mikhail Botvinik, of Russia — in 1960.
But already Bobby is regarded by leading chess critics as a genius.
“His is the sort of talent which is rarely, if ever, repeated,” said the president of the Manhattan Chess Club, where Bobby often plays.

TO maintain his talent Bobby concentrates all his interests and energies on chess.

Although “good average” at school, he does not care for lessons; the only literature he ever reads from choice are books of his favorite game.
Outdoor sport, once his chief interest, now takes a poor second place.
And his circle of friends has dwindled since he now has little in common with boys who do not share his enthusiasm for the game.
Bobby's exceptional ability was brought to light when his mother, anxious to keep his mind occupied, advertised in a local newspaper for some child to play chess with him.
A chess critic saw the advertisement and suggested that the boy should enter a chess exhibition at Brooklyn public library, where a well-known chess player was taking on allcomers.

RELUCTANTLY the expert took on seven-year-old Bobby — who surprised everyone by lasting 15 minutes.
Soon Bobby started entering for competitions, and at 13 became the U.S. junior champion.
Now he belongs to one of the most exclusive circles in the world, since there are only about 40 international grand masters still playing chess.
He is the extraordinary of a typically ordinary family. Joan has become a nurse like her mother, and the three of them still live modestly in Brooklyn.
Mrs. Fischer is immensely proud of her son.
“But,” she says, with genuine feeling, “I often wish he had stuck to baseball. He used to get so much more fun out of it.”


The Greenwood Commonwealth, Greenwood, Mississippi, Thursday, October 09, 1958 - Page 14

Bobby Fischer, the chess whiz, is described as an “average teenager.” It's about like picking the prettiest girl in town and naming her Miss Average Girl.


This quotation appears also in,

  • The Courier-News, Bridgewater, New Jersey, Saturday, December 27, 1958 - Page 5
  • The News Journal, Wilmington, Delaware, Monday, December 15, 1958 - Page 18
  • The Courier-News, Bridgewater, New Jersey, Saturday, December 27, 1958 - Page 6
  • The Bridgeport Post, Bridgeport, Connecticut, Wednesday, October 08, 1958 - Page 7
  • The Times Recorder, Zanesville, Ohio, Wednesday, October 22, 1958 - Page 4
  • Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Wednesday, October 08, 1958 - Page 24

The Ithaca Journal, Ithaca, New York, Thursday, October 09, 1958 - Page 6

Q. When did Bobby Fischer become the chess champion of the United States?
A. Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who has been playing chess since he was six, won the U.S. championship on Jan. 7, 1958, at the Manhattan Chess Club in New York City. He was 14 years old at the time.


Quad-City Times, Davenport, Iowa, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 46


This article also appears in,

  • Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 73
  • The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 64
  • The Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 10
  • The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 65
  • The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Thursday, October 16, 1958 - Page 7
  • The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 96
  • Star-Gazette, Elmira, New York, Sunday, October 19, 1958 - Page 41
  • Abilene Reporter-News, Abilene, Texas, Monday, October 13, 1958 - Page 26
  • The Times and Democrat, Orangeburg, South Carolina, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 3
  • Rocky Mount Telegram, Rocky Mount, North Carolina, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 6
  • Springfield Leader and Press, Springfield, Missouri, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 5
  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Sunday, October 19, 1958 - Page 94
  • Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Monday, October 13, 1958 - Page 2
  • Daily Press, Newport News, Virginia, Friday, October 17, 1958 - Page 28
  • The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 16
  • The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 16
  • The Salina Journal, Salina, Kansas, Friday, October 31, 1958 - Page 11
  • Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, New York, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 5
  • The Decatur Herald, Decatur, Illinois, Tuesday, October 14, 1958 - Page 6
  • Argus-Leader, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 34
  • Cumberland Sunday Times, Cumberland, Maryland, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 10
  • San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Monday, October 13, 1958 - Page 34
  • Logansport Pharos-Tribune, Logansport, Indiana, Sunday, October 19, 1958 - Page 10
  • The Terre Haute Tribune, Terre Haute, Indiana, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 38
  • The Progress-Index, Petersburg, Virginia, Thursday, October 23, 1958 - Page 16
  • San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 78
  • Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Arizona, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 10
  • The Palm Beach Post, West Palm Beach, Florida, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 37
  • The News Tribune, Fort Pierce, Florida, Thursday, October 16, 1958 - Page 13
  • Independent Press-Telegram, Long Beach, California, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 26
  • Independent Star-News, Pasadena, California, Sunday, October 26, 1958 - Page 15
  • The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Friday, October 24, 1958 - Page 18
  • Kingsport Times-News, Kingsport, Tennessee, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 32
  • The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 19

Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 53

Pawn My Word! Chess Whiz Fischer, 15, Out to Be World Champ

EDITOR'S NOTE: In outward appearance and behavior young Bobby Fischer is much like any other teenager. But his grand passion is chess, and having recently become an international grand master, he's now aiming for the world championship held by Soviet Russia.

NEW YORK—(AP)—There's a Batman comic book on his bedside table and a rock 'n' roll program blaring over his radio, he's slouchy, gangly and crew-cut.
But Batman is sprawled over an open chess book and his nail-bitten fingers are deftly moving chess pieces over the black and white board which means more to him than anything else in his life.
Bobby Fischer doesn't want to be a baseball star or a football player or the most popular fellow at the prom. He wants to be chess champion of the world — and it seems a pretty sure bet he will be.
Most Americans don't know it, but their honor in a big international contest with Russia is riding on the thin shoulders of this 15-year-old boy from Brooklyn.
Bobby is hailed by the experts as the greatest chess mind the world has produced in many years.

He doesn't look like one—he looks more like a farmer's boy than an intellectual—but he is a genius,” says Hans Kmoch, secretary of the Manhattan Chess Club, which is the nerve center of chess, in the United States.
“Fischer is something unique. None of the great ones ever accomplished so much so early.”

He has become an international grand master — the youngest in the long history of the game —and will meet the world's top seven players this year in a challengers' tournament. The exact date and place remain to be determined.
The winner will get a crack at the present world champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik.

* * *

SO FAR, this hasn't meant much to most Americans who look on chess as an intricate pastime for contemplative graybeards. But now even people uninterested in chess are beginning to feel it would be a fine feather in Uncle Sam's cap to have Bobby whip Russia's best players in a game that commands great attention in Europe and South America.

“Bobby himself — who presents a porcupine exterior to the world—doesn't show much interest in possible cold war implications of his career. He just wants to be champion.

If he makes it this try, he'll be the youngest world champion in chess history — and only the second American ever to occupy that lofty position.

The first U.S. champion was Paul Morphy, who turned the trick at 21 a century ago.
Bobby, who could give a clam lessons on how to keep its mouth shut, won't say what he thinks of his chances. Nobody else thinks he will make it this time.
But then, nobody thought he could win the American chess championship at 14 and nobody expected him to do very well at the recent international chess tournament in Yugoslavia.

“As the big chess players, all champions in their own countries, sat down opposite the bony young American, each informed that he would be beaten.”

Some were nicer than others —they said they were sorry to have to defeat him.
They didn't need to be. Most of them didn't. Bobby playing in his first international competition, pulled out of his early difficulties and tied for fifth place—winning his place in the star-studded challengers.

* * *

BOBBY is a tall boy with the classic adolescent slump and light brown hair. He eyes strangers in general and reporters in particular with glum distrust.
“Most reporters ask stupid questions. What do I eat for breakfast? That's not important. Why don't they ask about chess?” he said.
He sat on his bed, idly moving the figures on the chess board in front of him. He was dressed as usual in a sports shirt. Bobby won the American chess championship in dungarees and a T-shirt; no one remembers seeing him in a coat and tie.

The Russians keep winning the big ones in chess, he said because “everybody there plays. They're subsidized. Sure they put out a lot of books. Yeah, I can read a little Russian—I can read the moves. I can speak a little. Mr. Pressman at NYU (New York University) taught me.

“No you don't talk at chess tournaments. Why should you talk? Except when you offer a draw. But you can say anything. They know what you mean. Chess players speak lots of languages.
“Fun? No, a tournament's no fun, but they're all right.”

Does he think he can win the challengers' and get a shot at the championship? He shrugged and twisted his lip. “I don't know.”
Wouldn't it be nice to bring the world chess crown back to the United States for the first time in a 100 years?

A sudden, charming grin lit his face. And all at once you could see why the people who have got inside his prickly shell like Bobby Fischer very much indeed.
“It would be nice,” he agreed.

* * *

BOBBY has few friends his own age. He come home from school about 2 o'clock and picks up a chess book. Every spare minute, he is either reading about chess, analyzing moves on his bedside chess board or going somewhere to play chess.
Girls are nothing to him.
“Girls can't play chess,” he says.

“Bobby isn't interested in anybody unless they play chess—and there just aren't many kids who like it,” says Mrs. Fischer.
To make friends with Bobby, you not only have to play chess—you have to play good chess.

Maurice Kasper, president of the Manhattan Chess Club, commented:
“We have about 100 students in the club that Bobby could associate with. But he is so much superior, you see. He just plays with the stronger players.
Yes, Bobby definitely does think well of himself. But he is a phenomenon that happens once in a hundred years—in a thousand.
“He is also a young boy. He is not accustomed to such publicity and he can't handle it yet. But you must give him a little time. He is a good boy.”

Until last year, Bobby was little more than a good average student. But he is settling down and working hard. He scored an excellent 97 in New York's State's Regents exam on geometry last spring.

Prof. Aaron Pressman, who volunteered to tutor Bobby in Russian before the Yugoslav tournament, say Bobby is very bright. Pressman, who seems fond of Bobby adds that the boy worked very hard and learned rapidly.

* * *

BOBBY lives with his mother in a small fourth-floor walkup apartment in a neat section of Brooklyn. His 21-year-old sister, Joan, lived there too until her marriage last month. Their parents separated when Bobby was 2.
Mrs. Fischer, a University of Colorado graduate is a registered nurse now earning her MA degree. Bobby, she says is no disciplinary problem.

“There's nothing to discipline him about,” Mrs. Fischer explains. “The only thing I do is nag him to take his nose out of his chess books and go outside for some fresh air.

“You know, that's what aggravates me so. He used to be terrific in athletics. He didn't talk until he was practically 2 years old, but he was climbing all over the place.”
Bobby started in the game at age 6 when Joan got a chess set and the two puzzled out the directions. Mrs. Fischer doesn't know a thing about chess.

“I spent four years trying to get him away from it, but I've given up now,” she says, “He was only 8 when he first went to the Brooklyn Chess Club. He was pretty sensitive and they used to tease him about thinking he could play with grownups. He played about four years before he won at all.”

“I tried to stop him. The school people say I should try to get him away from it. He used to get awfully upset.
“You know, people say it's the publicity that attracts him to chess. Well, there wasn't any glory for years. It was all discouragement.”


The Dispatch, Moline, Illinois, Thursday, October 16, 1958 - Page 6

Genius and Joy
One of the marks of genius, it is said, is single-mindedness, an ability to shut out the world in the pursuit of an objective. A recent article about Sigmund Freud credits him with this knack.
And now there is Bobby Fischer, a 15-year-old Brooklyn boy who has become one of the world masters of chess. “Bobby has few friends his own age,” said the news item. “He comes home from school about 2 o'clock and picks up a chess book. Every spare minute, he is either reading about chess, analyzing moves on his bedside chess board, or going somewhere to play chess.”
The genius no doubt finds the same degree of joy in his life as anyone else. But he certainly misses a lot.


The Star Press, Muncie, Indiana, Saturday, October 18, 1958 - Page 2

Wants to Be World Champ Chess Wizard Bobby Fischer
NEW YORK (AP)—There's a Batman comic book on his bedside table and a rock 'n' roll program blaring over his radio. He's slouchy, gangly and crew-cut.
But Batman is sprawled over an open chess book and his nail-bitten fingers are deftly moving chess pieces over the black and white board which means more to him than anything else in his life, be a baseball star or a football player or the most popular fellow at the prom. He wants to be chess champion of the world—and it seems a pretty sure bet he will be.

Honor Rides on Him
Most Americans don't know it, but their honor in a big international contest with Russia is riding on the thin shoulders of this 15-year-old boy from Brooklyn.
Bobby is hailed by the experts as the greatest chess mind the world has produced in many years.
“He doesn't look like one — he looks more like a farmer's boy than an intellectual—but he is a genius,” says Hans Kmoch, secretary of the Manhattan Chess Club, which is the nerve center of chess in the United States.
He has become an international grand master—the youngest in the long history of the game—and will meet the world's top seven players this year in a challenger's tournament. The exact date and place remain to be determined.
The winner will get a crack at the present world champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik.

He's a Quiet Lad
Bobby, who could give a clam lessons on how to keep its mouth shut, won't say what he thinks of his chances. Nobody else thinks he will make it this time.
But then, nobody thought he could win the American chess championship at 14 and nobody expected him to do well at the recent international chess tournament in Yugoslavia.
Bobby, playing in his first international competition, tied for fifth place—winning his place in the star-studded Challengers.
Bobby has few friends his own age. He comes home from school about 2 o'clock and picks up a chess book. Every spare minute, he is either reading about chess, analyzing moves on his bedside chess board or going somewhere to play chess.
“Bobby isn't interested in anybody unless they play chess—and there just aren't many kids who like it,” says Mrs. Fischer.
To make friends with Bobby, you not only have to play chess—you have to play good chess.
Bobby lives with his mother in a small fourth-floor walkup apartment in a neat section of Brooklyn. His 21-year-old sister, Joan, lived there too until her marriage last month. Their parents separated when Bobby was 2.
Mrs. Fischer, a University Colorado graduate, is a registered nurse now earning her M.A. degree. Bobby, she says, is no disciplinary problem.
“There's nothing to discipline him about,” Mrs. Fischer explains.


This article also appears in,

  • Monroe Morning World, Monroe, Louisiana, Sunday, October 26, 1958 - Page 11
  • The Times Herald, Port Huron, Michigan, Thursday, October 23, 1958 - Page 23

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Sunday, October 19, 1958 - Page 25

Bobby Fischer Has Chess Experts Agog
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP)— It's October, a little more than a month after the interzonal chess tournament, and in America the talk is of football.
But here in Yugoslavia and throughout Europe, the people have never heard of Navy Joe's Tranchini or Ohio State's Frank Kremblas.
And even if they had, they would prefer to talk about Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn boy with the mind of a quarterback, the self-discipline of a linebacker, and the title of grand master of chess.
Chances are Bobby, the boy, or Robert, as he prefers to be called when playing chess, has never heard of Tranchini or Kremblas either. And they may not have heard of him.

Started at Age 6
Bobby's mother says there was a time when he used to be very good at athletics, but that must have been before he reached the age of six. That's when he learned the moves of chess and he hasn't stopped studying them since. He says he is interested in virtually nothing else.
This is exceptional in the United States where the game is taken far less seriously than football, and even in Europe, where chess has undergone more refinements than the split - T, the chess masters are amazed at the genius of the gangling Fischer.
A tall boy with the classic adolescent slump, he doesn't look like a quarterback. He just thinks like one.

Youngest in History
He became the youngest grandmaster in history by his expert play at the Interzonal tournament here.
He left behind him eight world best grand masters and seven international masters. He failed to place first but captured the title of grand master and qualified for the Tournament of Candidates, the third stage in world championship competition.
Bobby impressed fellow competitors with his mature play in his first international tournament. He knew exactly what he wanted. The toughness of the will with which he fulfilled his aim was wonderful.
He is now a candidate for the world championship held by Russian Grand Master Mikhail Botvinik. Fischer can challenge Botvinik in 1960 if he wins next year's Tournament of Candidates.

Most Serious Player
Bobby, who won the U.S. Junio title in 1956 and the U.S. Open this year, was the most serious player in the interzonal tourney.
Only the Russians with their famous discipline could match him. But while the Russians occasionally went for a swim or a walk, Bobby remained in the tournament hall or in his hotel room. His self-imposed discipline was amazing, and he grew angry at reporters who kept stressing his age. He said he wanted to be judged only on his play.
When the tournament began Bobby said privately: “I plan to qualify for the tournament of candidates. To achieve that it is necessary to draw with the great players and some of the weaker. That will bring me enough points to qualify.”

Followed Plan
He followed his plan stubbornly and with success. Some of his foes thought they could trap “The Boy” by bizarre variations or surprise him with an unusual move to break his opposition.
But the lad proved them wrong. Johnny Lujack never called a cooler football game.
Bobby is regarded here as the first challenger in years to Russian chess supremacy.
But like the football players, he must go to school while Russian stars dedicate almost their entire time to chess.


Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, November 02, 1958 - Page 64

“A copy of ‘Leaves of Chess,’ issue No. 10, has been received, and devotes most of the space to the feats of Bobby Fischer. Several of his games at Portoroz are published. It also tells that when Bobby was seven years old, he tried to secure games with other young players. Herman Helms, chess editor of the Brooklyn Eagle, suggested several ways in which he might contact other players.”


This quote also appears in the following:

  • The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Monday, November 10, 1958 - Page 4
  • Corsicana Daily Sun, Corsicana, Texas, Thursday, October 09, 1958 - Page 23
  • The News-Herald, Franklin, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, September 30, 1958 - Page 4
  • St. Cloud Times, Saint Cloud, Minnesota, Wednesday, November 26, 1958 - Page 4

The Winona Daily News, Winona, Minnesota, Monday, November 03, 1958 - Page 12

Bobby Fischer, the chess whiz, is described as an “average teenager.” It's about like picking the prettiest girl in town and naming her Miss Average Girl.


Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Thursday, November 13, 1958 - Page 59

CAN U.S. CHESS WHIZ, 15, BEAT RUSSIANS?

When It's Autumn In Europe, The Talk Is Only Of Chess—And Bobby Fischer
By BORIS BOSKOVIC
Associated Press Staff Writer

PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia,— It's November, a little more than two months after the interzonal chess tournament, and in America the talk is of football.
But here in Yugoslavia, and throughout Europe, the people have never heard of Navy Joe Tranchini or Ohio State's Frank Kremblas.
And even if they had, they would prefer to talk about Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn boy with the mind of a quarterback, the self-discipline of a linebacker and the title of grand master of chess.
Chances are Bobby, the boy, or Robert, as he prefers to be called when playing chess, has never heard of Tranchini or Kremblas either. And they may not have heard of him.

Bobby's mother says there was a time when he used to be very good at athletics, but that must have been before he reached the age of six. That's when he learned the moves of chess and he hasn't stopped studying them since. He says he is interested in virtually nothing else.

This is exceptional in the United States where the game is taken far less seriously than football, and even in Europe, where chess has undergone more refinements than the split-T, the chess masters are amazed at the genius of the gangling Fisher.
A tall boy with the classic adolescent slump, he doesn't look like a quarterback. He just thinks like one.
He became the youngest grand master in history by his expert play at the interzonal tournament here.

He left behind him eight world best grand masters and seven international masters. He failed to place first but captured the title of grand master and qualified for the tournament of candidates, the third stage in world championship competition.

Bobby impressed fellow competitors with his mature play in his first international tournament. He knew exactly what he wanted. The toughness of the will with which he fulfilled his aim was wonderful.
He is now a candidate for the world championship held by Russian Grand Master Mikhail Botvinik in 1960 if he wins next year's tournament of candidates.
Bobby, who won the U.S. Junior title in 1956 and the U.S. Open this year, was the most serious player in the interzonal tourney.
Only the Russians with their famous discipline could match him. But while the Russians occasionally went for a swim or a walk, Bobby remained in the tournament hall or in his hotel room. His self-imposed discipline was amazing, and he grew angry at reporters who kept stressing his age. He said he wanted to be judged only on his play.

When the tournament began Bobby said privately: “I plan to qualify for the tournament of candidates. To achieve that it is necessary to draw with the great players and defeat some of the weaker. That will bring me enough points to qualify.”

He followed his plan stubbornly and with success. Some of his foes thought they could trap “the boy” by bizarre variations or surprise him with an unusual move to break his opposition.
But the lad proved them wrong. Johnny Lujack never called a cooler football game.
Bobby is regarded here as the first challenger in years to Russian chess supremacy.
But like the football players, he must go to school while Russian stars dedicate almost their entire time to chess.


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, November 16, 1958 - Page 78

Much more astonishing was the triumph of 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn. Starting off a little insecurely, he seemed to gather fresh strength and confidence with every round, until at the end it was the grandmasters who were afraid of him. What interested the onlooker is the nature of his style. Unlike the normal good boy player, he does not spend his time looking for combinations. If, the complications come, then he can “ride the whirlwind and command the storm” with a calm ease worthy of a Capablanca. He can produce the appropriate combination at the appropriate moment, but for the most part he is content to win by utilizing a remarkably mature positional judgment.
The possibilities of such a player are truly enormous. Practically no bounds can be set on the development of a genius that is based on such secure foundations. He has already achieved much—U.S. champion and international grandmaster at 15—but certainly will achieve considerably more in the future.
Some six months ago I wrote that it would not be long before Bobby Fischer would be knocking at the door that led to the world championship, and he already is knocking louder than I or most other people anticipated.


This article also appears in,

  • The Index-Journal, Greenwood, South Carolina, Saturday, November 22, 1958 - Page 3
  • The Springfield News-Leader, Springfield, Missouri, Friday, November 14, 1958 - Page 28
  • The Times, Munster, Indiana, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 51
  • Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Sunday, November 09, 1958 - Page 3
  • The Jackson Sun, Jackson, Tennessee, Wednesday, November 19, 1958 - Page 16
  • Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola, Florida, Sunday, November 16, 1958 - Page 44
  • Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, November 16, 1958 - Page 20
  • The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, November 16, 1958 - Page 20
  • St. Cloud Times, Saint Cloud, Minnesota, Friday, December 26, 1958 - Page 12
  • The Post-Crescent, Appleton, Wisconsin, Tuesday, November 18, 1958 - Page 14
  • The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, November 16, 1958 - Page 20
  • Standard-Sentinel, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, Wednesday, December 10, 1958 - Page 14
  • The Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune, Chillicothe, Missouri, Monday, November 10, 1958 - Page 15
  • Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon, Sunday, December 07, 1958 - Page 22
  • Tallahassee Democrat, Tallahassee, Florida, Saturday, November 15, 1958 - Page 3
  • The Progress, Clearfield, Pennsylvania, Wednesday, December 31, 1958 - Page 7
  • The Daily Journal, Vineland, New Jersey, Monday, November 24, 1958 - Page 4
  • The Gastonia Gazette, Gastonia, North Carolina, Monday, November 24, 1958 - Page 13
  • Galesburg Register-Mail, Galesburg, Illinois, Saturday, November 22, 1958 - Page 3
  • Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Fairbanks, Alaska, Saturday, December 27, 1958 - Page 5
  • Hattiesburg American, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, Tuesday, November 11, 1958 - Page 6
  • The Independent Record, Helena, Montana, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 16
  • The Express, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, Thursday, December 11, 1958 - Page 21
  • Greeley Daily Tribune, Greeley, Colorado, Thursday, November 20, 1958 - Page 31
  • Carrol Daily Times Herald, Carroll, Iowa, Friday, November 14, 1958 - Page 8
  • Quad-City Times, Davenport, Iowa, Friday, November 14, 1958 - Page 30
  • Star-Gazette, Elmira, New York, Thursday, November 20, 1958 - Page 7
  • The Morning Herald, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, Wednesday, November 12, 1958 - Page 4
  • The Amarillo Globe-Times, Amarillo, Texas, Monday, November 17, 1958 - Page 16
  • The Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Corpus Christi, Texas, Sunday, November 23, 1958 - Page 38
  • The Burlington Free Press, Burlington, Vermont, Saturday, December 20, 1958 - Page 6
  • Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, Monday, November 24, 1958 - Page 21
  • The News Leader, Staunton, Virginia, Sunday, November 30, 1958 - Page 12
  • Daily Independent Journal, San Rafael, California, Friday, December 26, 1958 - Page 17
  • Great Bend Tribune, Great Bend, Kansas, Monday, November 24, 1958 - Page 14
  • Chillicothe Gazette, Chillicothe, Ohio, Thursday, November 13, 1958 - Page 21

The Marion Star, Marion, Ohio, Thursday, December 04, 1958 - Page 40

Chess Champ Gives Mother New Worries
American Youngster Encounters Problems In European Travels

NEW YORK (AP)—Ever have trouble coping with your teen-ager? How would you like it if he were a genius?
“It's not easy,” says Mrs. Regina Fischer of Brooklyn.
Her 15-year-old son, Bobby, is a genius at chess. He won the United States championship at 14 and became the youngest international Grand Master in history last summer.
His one dream is to snatch the world chess crown from the present champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik.
One of Mrs. Fischer's definitely “not easy” moments came last summer when Bobby appeared to be stranded in Yugoslavia after his first international tournament.

Unable To Get Plane
“He had a round trip ticket, but nobody made any reservations for him and he couldn't get a plane. I knew he'd spent most of his money at the World Fair in Belgium and I was afraid the Yugoslav Chess Federation wouldn't go on paying for him after the tournament had ended.
“I went to the Yugoslav Embassy but it was the weekend and I couldn't find anybody. I tried to call Bobby, but they said he had left by train.
“I was really worried. I knew he was loaded down with books and I didn't see how he could manage. He doesn't speak the languages. I could just see him sleeping in a train station somewhere and people stealing everything he had.”
But Bobby used his tournament prize money to get to Munich where he found plane space home.
Chess is not a popular game and there are no funds to send the American champion to tournaments. Bobby won two tickets to Yugoslavia on a television program. His 21-year-old sister, Joan, took the second.

Remains at Home
“Bobby doesn't like the idea of his mother going around with him to tournaments. Besides, I figured it would be better for me to be here in case anything was needed—, primarily.”
She laughed ruefully—a slender, dark-haired woman with a smiling mouth in a gamine face. The Fischers separated when Bobby was 2 and Mrs. Fischer raised her two children on her earnings as a nurse.
“I don't discipline Bobby. He's too big. Anyway, there's not much to say. He comes home and sticks his nose in a chess book, stops to eat, and he's back again until it's time to go to bed.
“Bobby's one of the ones who play for blood, as they say in chess. He's serious. He has to study all the time. The countries publish pamphlets and books at a greatrate—new openings always being worked out.
“He's not interested in girls yet—they don't play chess. He doesn't smoke or drink. He does chew his nails down to the bone, but I'm afraid to make him stop. I don't know what he might take up.
“Some of these chess players twitch all over. Honest. They start with an eye and twitch down to their feet and start again. I'd rather he chewed his nails.”

Becomes YMCA Member
“The only thing I do is nag him to get some fresh air. This year he's joined the “Y” and says he's going to get in better physical shape.
“He used to be wonderful at sports—in fact, he himself used to say he wanted to be a baseball player.
“I don't know a thing about chess. In fact, I tried to make him stop for four years. But I've given up now.”


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 07, 1958 - Page 42

Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old grandmaster from Brooklyn and current titleholder, will attempt to repeat his triumph of a year ago.


Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, December 07, 1958 - Page 119

Championship Chess
By BLAKE STEVENS
Texas State Chess Champion
The season for simultaneous exhibitions is here, with several Texas cities sponsoring these events, George Koltanowski makes several trips a year through Southern states, and San Antonio invited him to lecture and play against local enthusiasts a few weeks ago.
“Kolty” as his friends call him, made a fine score, winning 21 games and drawing two. He had trouble in only one game when, in an effort to save a pawn, he lost his queen for two pieces.
After the game was concluded, his opponent irked by losing, told him that he should have won the game, to which Kolty replied, “I made one mistake, you made one mistake, but unfortunately, yours was the last mistake.”
His lecture was witty and entertaining, with the core of it concerning Bobby Fischer's chance at garnering the world chess crown. Mr. Koltanowski feels, as I do, that Fischer's potentialities can not easily be judged, that he has fooled the wise men more than once and might do it again.
Actually, if Fischer places one from the bottom, this would be quite an accomplishment when one considers the calibre of players against whom he will be pitted in the Candidates Tournament.

Surprised Russians
Fischer, as Kolty pointed out, refused to play in simultaneous tournaments or against lesser Russian masters on his recent trip to the U.S.S.R., which surprised (and irritated) the Russians. This shows remarkable wisdom on the part of this 15 year old
The Russians, it shoudl be noted, did not give Fischer the chance of playing their top men, Smyslov, Keres, Tahl, or Bronstein. It is not impossible that Fischer could become the chess champion of the world.
Mr. Koltanowski concluded with two games played blindfolded at the same time, which he won handily. He then called for questions from the audience. At midnight the lecture ended, and everyone went home well satisfied.


Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 18, 1958 - Page 6

Bobby Fischer to Defend Crown at Tournament
One year ago 14-year-old Bobby Fischer won the U.S. National-Rosenwald Tournament, adding the national title to the U.S. Open and National Junior championships that he already held.
Starting tonight Bobby will defend the national crown against the best players that can be mustered against him. He comes up to the tournament with still further laurels, having during the past summer qualified at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, for the challenger's tournament next year which will produce the next opponent of Champion Mikhail Botvinnik for the world's championship. Bobby finished a brilliant fifth in his first big international test and fully lived up to his precedent-shattering achievements of the previous year in this country.
Fischer has been attending his classes in a Brooklyn high school since returning from Europe and it remains to be seen whether he will show signs of “rust” in defending his national crown. At his age and apparent stage of chess development that seems unlikely.


Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Thursday, December 25, 1958 - Page 48

BOY, 15, BEATS AMERICA'S ACE CHESS PLAYER
New York, Dec. 24 [Special]
—The 15 year old United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, created a sensation Wednesday at the Manhattan Chess club by defeating Samuel Reshevsky, America's international ace, in their sixth-round game in the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy tournament.
The added point gave Fischer a score of 4-1 in the field of 12 and ended a three-way tie for the lead among Reshevsky, Larry Evans and Fischer. The Fischer-Reschevsky match was played ahead of the regular schedule. In addition, Fischer has an adjourned game pending from the fourth round.


Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 30

Fischer, 15, Holds Lead in U.S. Chess
New York, Dec. 27—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15 year old United States chess champion, and Donald Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., agreed to a draw after 48 moves in the seventh round of the annual United States championship Saturday.
Fischer conducted the black pieces, and altho he was on the defensive in the opening, he soon took the aggressive, sacrificed the exchange and, from then on, set the pace.
They agreed to the draw when preparations had been made to adjourn after a five hour session. Fischer then led the field of 12 with a score of 4½-1½. He still had an unfinished game from the fourth round. He will meet Larry Evans, second with 4-1, in the eighth round.
The fist game to be finished in the seventh round was a draw in 35 moves between Charles Kalme of Philadelphia and William Lombardy, City College of New York and world junior champion.


Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 14

Young American Chess Player Still in First
NEW YORK (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old defending champion from New York strengthened his hold on first place in the United States championship Sunday when he drew with Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich., after 40 moves in the seventh round.
The draw gave Fischer a 5-2 record. Bobby has not lost a match but has drawn in four. There are nine rounds in the tournament.
Former champion Samuel Reshevsky moved into a tie for second place with a 4½-2½ mark when he defeated Larry Evans of New York in 39 moves. Arthur B. Bisguier of New York, who also has a 4½-2½ record, defeated Charles Kalme, Philadelphia, in 40 moves.


The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 15

Fischer Takes Lead In National Chess
New York, Dec. 28 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn's teen-age whiz kid, moved into first place in the National chess championships last night when he drew with Don Byrne, of Valparaiso, Ind., in 48 moves.
The half point he gained enabled him to inch ahead of Larry Evans, of New York. Bobby now has 4½ points to 4 for Evans. They will go right on to the title.
There were two other draws in the night's action; Charles Kalme, of Philadelphia, and William Lombardy, of New York, finished in a deadlock in 38 moves, and Ray Weinstein, of Brooklyn, and Arthur Bisguier, of New York, finished even in 56 moves.