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1959 Bobby Fischer Newspaper Articles

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The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 01, 1959 - Page 5

Fischer's great win
The 15-year-old United States champion, Bobby Fischer, has just brought off another astonishing victory in the current American championship by winning Reshevsky's queen in only twelve moves. Reshevsky is considered by many the world's greatest player outside Russia.
Reshevsky resigned 30 moves later. Fischer leads the tournament with four out of five.
The modern forms of the King's Indian Defence, in which Black combines the fianchetto of his KB with a general pawn advance on the queen's wing, are so popular nowadays that there is a tendency to underestimate White's opportunities for central break-through if Black carries out his plans inaccurately. The following example was won by the young Hungarian champion who is now competing at Hastings.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Times, San Mateo, California, Thursday, January 01, 1959 - Page 107

Chess Champ
New York (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15, won the national chess title Sunday for the second straight year.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Minneapolis Star, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 24

SAMUEL RESHEVSKY, five times champion, moved into second place behind defending champion Bobby Fischer in the national chess tournament when he defeated James T. Sherwin for a 7-3 record. Fischer is 7-2.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Battle Creek Enquirer, Battle Creek, Michigan, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 12

Former Olivet Man Seeks Chess Crown
OLIVET—Donald Byrne, a former English instructor at Olivet College, is still competing for the national chess championship in New York City. He defeated Brother Robert of Indianapolis in 53 moves in an adjourned match of the ninth round.
Veteran Samuel Reshevsky, five times former U.S. champion who Byrne played to a draw in an earlier round, is in second place with a record of seven wins and three losses. Still in first place is 15-year-old Bobby Fischer, U.S. Champion, who has a 7-2 record.
Byrne is now residing in Valparaiso, Ind.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Ironwood Daily Globe, Ironwood, Michigan, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 12

Reshevsky in Second Place in Chess Match
NEW YORK (AP) — Veteran Samuel Reshevsky, five times former champion, moved into second place behind defending titleholder Bobby Fischer in the National Chess Tournament Thursday night when he defeated James T. Sherwin in 37 moves.
Reshevsky, a round ahead of the other leaders, has a 7-3 record compared to 7-2 for Fischer.
In the only other match, Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich., defeated Brother Robert of Indianapolis in 53 moves in a match adjourned from the ninth round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Vidette-Messenger of Porter County, Valparaiso, Indiana, Saturday, January 03, 1959 - Page 5

Byrne Moves Up In Chess
NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., defeated Charles Kalme of Philadelphia in 26 moves and Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, turned back Ray Weinstein of Brooklyn College in 40 moves Friday night in the National Chess Championship.
The victories gave Byrne a 5½-4½ record and Benko a mark of 4½-4½. They were the only completed matches.
Bobby Fischer, the teen-age ace from Brooklyn, still leads with a 7-2 record.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36

Bobby Fischer Nearing Second U.S. Chess Title
NEW YORK, Jan. 3 (AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York moved within one-half point of winning his second straight national chess title tonight when he defeated Arthur B. Bisguier of New York in 86 moves.
The victory in a 10th round adjourned match gave Fischer an 8-2 standing compared to 7-3 of veteran Samuel Reshevsky.
In other matches today, world juniro champion William Lombardy of New York defeated Larry Evans, New York, in 41 moves and Robert Byrne of Indianapolis turned back Edmar Mednis, New York University student, in 48. Charles Kalme, Philadelphia, and Paul Benko, Hungarian exile, played 50 moves to a draw.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36

FISCHER IN LEAD, BEATS RESHEVSKY
In the most sensational game to date in the tournament for the United States Chess Championship, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer, playing in defense of his title, defeated former champion Samuel Reshevsky, according to a report form the New York Times.
Playing in the sixth round of the tournament at the Manhattan Chess Club in New York, Reshevsky countered Fischer's P-K4 with the Sicilian Defense. On his eighth turn Reshevsky moved his knight to the QR file, to exchange it for Fischer's bishop. This turned out to be a blunder.
Fischer promptly seized the opportunity for a subtle combination, based on the lack of mobility of the black queen. He sacrificed his bishop and followed with a move of his knight that imprisoned the queen. Reshevsky was forced to abandon that powerful piece in exchange for two minor pieces.
Reshevsky fought on but with virtually no hope. Fischer soon won a pawn and established a passed pawn on the queen side which could not be halted in the long run. Reshevsky resigned the struggle after 42 moves.
In two other completed games last week Fischer drew with Paul Benko and Donald Byrne to lead the tournament with a score of 4½-1½. He had previously defeated James T. Sherwin and Charles Kalme and drawn with William Lombardy.
Reshevsky came back in the seventh round with an important victory over Larry Evans, who had been in the lead for the first week. Playing the white pieces against the Nimzo-Indian Defense, Reshevsky started a king's side attack, sacrificing a pawn to obtain control of the king's bishop file.
Step by step Reshevsky gained ground until his pursuit of the black king was rewarded. Faced by a threatened checkmate, Evans gave up his queen for a rook but obtained only temporary relief. He was actually checkmated on the 39th move.
As a result Evans and Reshevsky were tied for second at 4-2, a score which was equaled by Arthur B. Bisguier. The latter is the only undefeated player beside Fischer.
Following are last week's results and games from the tournament:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 18

NEARS 2D TITLE
NEW YORK —(AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York moved within one-half point of winning his second straight national chess championship Saturday night when he defeated Arthur B. Bisguier of New York in 86 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 48

Chess Championship
“At present writing, Bobby Fischer leads the field, having defeated Samuel Reshevsky in their match, and his score now is 5-2. Reshevsky and two others are tied for second place.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36

Chess Win Near
New York — (AP) — Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York moved within one-half point of winning his second straight national chess championship tonight when he defeated Arthur B. Bisquier of New York in 86 moves. The victory in a 10th round, adjourned match gave Fischer an 8-2 standing compared to 7-3 for veteran Samuel Reshevsky.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 4

Boy, 15, Nears Chess Laurels
NEW YORK — (AP) — Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York moved within one-half point of winning his second straight national chess championship last night when he defeated Arthur B. Bisguier of New York in 86 moves.
The victory in a 10th round adjourned match gave Fischer an 8-2 standing compared to 7-3 of veteran Samuel Reshevsky. World junior champion William Lombardy of New York defeated Larry Evens, New York, in 41 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 9

CHESS
“NEW YORK—Fifteen-year old Bobby Fischer won the national chess title for the second straight year.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 60

BOBBY FISCHER RETAINS U.S. CHESS CROWN
New York, Jan. 4 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 15 year old Brooklyn whiz kid, retained his national chess championship Sunday when he drew with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis in 28 moves.
That gave Fischer an 8½-2½ record. Bobby didn't lose a match, but a draw counts a half point in the losing column.
Samuel Reshevsky of New York, the only grand master competing, finished second with 7½-3½. His only loss was to Fischer. He drew with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, in 14 moves in his final match.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 2

Fischer Wins U.S. Chess Title
NEW YORK (CP)—Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer won the United States chess championship for the second time in a row Sunday night by drawing his 11th and final match against Robert Byrne of Indianapolis.
The 15-year-old high school student was the only undefeated player in the tournament. He had established himself strongly in first place Saturday night after an 86-move win over Arthur B. Bisguier, and he needed only a draw to clinch the title. He won six games and drew five.
Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y. drew with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, after 14 moves. Reshevsky's final score of 7½-3½ was made up of five wins, five ties and one loss—to Fischer.
Fischer's defeat of the international grand master in the sixth round was the turning point in the tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 16

Teenager Repeats World Chess Title: Old Men Stubborn … but Kid's Got It
New York—(AP)—An air of expectancy filled the arena and yet it was still.
The spectators sized up the opponents.
Their faces almost told their thoughts.
Could he repeat, they wondered. Could this youngster beat out the old master for the national championship?
Yes, a national title was at stake and the spectators were tense—the kind of tenseness that can grip only a national championship.
The youngster was only 15. His hair was mussed and he was wearing a striped sport shirt—just a boy trying to do a man's job. He was on the brink of the title.
He studied his opponent and the play started.
On and on, the test of nerves and brains went. The youngster used every trick at his command.

★ ★ ★

NOW HE WAS on the verge of winning.
But he called a half and offered his opponent a draw.
The opponent shook his head and scowled. He was not going to give up at this stage. He was going all out for the victory.
The teenager's eyes hardened.
Young as he was, he had been through this sort of thing before. Now he was expanding every last wile.
Two more hours went by and the battle continued.
Abruptly, his adversary called a halt. He was on the ropes. The shoe, indeed, was on the other foot.
“Will you settle for a draw?” he asked.
“Draw,” murmured the youngster, hardly raising his eyebrows.
The crowd grinned, but didn't make a sound.

★ ★ ★

NOT FAR AWAY, the older man—now 47 but himself once a child ace at his chosen game—sighed heavily.
The handwriting was on the wall. He couldn't win now.

“Will you settle for a draw?” he whispered to his opponent.
“Draw,” said the opponent

The older man had lost only one match in the weeklong championship tournament. But that was a fatal one. He had been beaten by the teenager after being drawn into a trap that even the spectators recognized.
It was, he reflected, one of the biggest mistakes of his long and glorious career.

He looked at the scoreboard. The youngster finished with a mark of 8½-2½. He had 7½-3½.

And that's how Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn high school student, won his second consecutive United States chess championship yesterday. And that's how Grand Master Samuel Reshevsky, five times former champion, lost it.
Fischer's final-match draw was with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis in 28 moves. Reshevsky drew with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, in 14 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Minneapolis Star, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 25

Fischer Wins
NEW YORK—(AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn high school boy, won his second consecutive United States chess championship Sunday. He beat out Samuel Reshevsky, five-time champion, 8½-2½ to 7½-3½.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Indiana, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 15

Chess
Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn won his second straight national championship in New York when he drew with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis in 28 moves. That gave Fischer an 8½-2½ record. Samuel Reshevsky of New York finished second with 7½-3½.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 08, 1959 - Page 7

Bobby Fischer, 15, Wins U.S. Tourney Twice
At the age of 15, Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn high school student is two-time winner of the United States chess championship.
Fischer went undefeated and successfully defended the title he won last year in the 11-round championship event, which now carries with it the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy. Bobby's victory was cleancut, 6 victories and 5 draws giving him a final score of 8½-2½. This was a full point advantage over five-time former champion Samuel Reshevsky, which at 7½-3½ was likewise a full point ahead of James T. Sherwin in third.

The field could not have been a stronger one, making Fischer's victory all the more glowing. And as cream on the peaces, he clinched it by a sensational triumph over Reshevsky in their match, the score of which is reproduced below with notes by the New York Times reporter.
‘(A) Here is where Reshevsky over-anxious to be rid of the powerful white bishop, went astray and gave the alert schoolboy his big chance. Fischer was prepared for it. He sacrificed the bishop in question brought out the black king seemingly in a safe retreat, and then parted with a knight. The black queen was hemmed in and had to be abandoned in exchange for two pieces. From then on Fischer pressed his advantage, step by step, until Reshevsky resigned after 42 moves.
(B) Somewhat better would have been 9 KtxB although Fischer still would have had the advantage.’

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, Maryland, Friday, January 09, 1959 - Page 31

Master At Chess — That whiz kid on the chess board, Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn, N.Y., youth plays tennis at Grossinger, N.Y. after retaining his U.S. chess crown.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Times, Munster, Indiana, Monday, February 09, 1959 - Page 13


Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 25
Let's Play Chess By Frank Rose

U.S. Championship
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old chess genius from Brooklyn, successfully defended his title as U.S. Chess Champion with the convincing score of 8½-2½. He won six games and drew five. Samuel Reshevsky was runner-up with 7½-3½, scoring five wins, five draws and one loss to Fischer. Here are the results: …
SICILIAN DEFENSE
Although his game with Reshevsky lasted 42 moves Fischer had a “won” game after his ninth move. His play sparkles with daring and originality as he captures new meaning in a hackneyed position. Like Alekhine, he can say, “Why should I play by the Book? I am the Book.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 39

FISCHER COPS ROSENWALD
Young Bobby Fischer, who last year won just about every American chess honor, including the U.S. championship (junior, open, and U.S. C.F.), forced Donald Byrne to accept a draw in the final round of this year's Rosenwald U.S.C.F. tournament to assure himself a clear win. Fischer went undefeated in the event, and won over Reshevsky in their individual game to drop the Western Hemisphere champion to second place.
Fischer had the added satisfaction of finishing higher than Pal Benko, who placed third to Fischer's fifth in the recent interzonal at Potoroz, Yugoslavia, though both qualified for the World Candidates' tournament coming up this summer.
With no notable exception, the field in the Rosenwald included all the strongest players in the U.S. Fischer, thus remains the “man” to beat.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 32

Fischer Retains American Title; German Master Wins at Hastings
America's chess prodigy, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, has done it again!
The 15-year-old United States champion retained his title last week when he finished on top of the finest field this country could muster. It was the New York tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy.
Fischer's victory was not easy, though. It was a bruising battle right down to the wire before he edged out Samuel Reshevsky, also of Brooklyn and Larry Evans of New York City.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Thursday, January 15, 1959 - Page 3

Fifteen-Year-Old Chess Champ In World Finals
By Joseph MacSween, Canadian Press Staff Writer
NEW YORK (CP) — The thin shoulders of a Brooklyn schoolboy carry the main United States hopes of winning the world chess championship from Russia.
The boy is Bobby Fischer, 15, and victory for him would be one of the biggest upsets in the ancient history of chess.
“It would be nice,” is the way Bobby put it, with a rare grin at his own understatement.
Bobby — who would prefer the more dignified Robert when he plays chess — recently retained the U.S. crown without losing a game. He won six games and drew five, playing as usual against the best American grownups.
The world's youngest grand master of the game, he will next take part in an elimination tournament of international grand masters to decide who will challenge Mikhail Botvinnik, the 47-year-old Moscow electrical engineer who is king of them all

CALLED GENIUS
“Bobby may not look it — he doesn't look like an intellectual — but he's a genius,” says Hans Kmoch, secretary of the Manhattan Chess Club, where the U.S. tournament is held.
“He's professionally arrogant,” says one mildly critical associate.
“He's a nice, fine, modest boy,” says Mrs. Grace L. Corey, administrative assistant of Erasmus Hall high school, where Bobby is a student.
What does Bobby himself say?
“I'll talk about nothing but chess,” said the master, distrustful and slightly belligerant when approached by a reporter.
Tall and gangling, he has the typical adolescent slouch and harsh voice of the Brooklyn teenager. In looks he could well be a rock 'n' roll addict as a dedicated chess player.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Austin Daily Herald, Austin, Minnesota, Thursday, January 15, 1959 - Page 4

Austin Daily Herald's POT POURRI
A HIGH school in Brooklyn decided that even though he had never given medals to anyone, the situation this time warranted a break in precedent. It gave a gold medal to one of its 15-year-old students, Bobby Fischer. No one said he didn't deserve it.
For Bobby had just won the United States chess championship for the second year in a row. And last year he won the right to compete with the world's chess greats in a competition to decide who will challenge the present world champion next year. He is one of many American youngsters in fields where brains reign supreme.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 18, 1959 - Page 45

Championship Games
The table of the U.S. Chess Championship Tournament below shows the solidity of Bobby Fischer's triumph. He was the only player not to lose a game outright and he scored victories against his top three opponents.
Following are some hard-fought battles from the event.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, January 18, 1959 - Page 75

“This is not the case with Bobby Fischer. He is in the midst of the U.S. National Championship, and going strong. With two rounds remaining, he is leading such notables as Reshevsky, Bisguier, Evans, Lombardy, Donald and Robert Byrne, Sherwin, Mednis, and Benko. And he is only 15! Surely a future world champion!”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 22, 1959 - Page 36

We are indebted to the Illustrated London News
“…One reason for the failure of the United States to finish better than fourth, probably, was Bobby Fischer's absence from the team. It is news to us, however, if the reason for his absence was “because he had not been guaranteed a big enough fee,” as the London weekly says. There was the little matter of Bobby's attending classes at Erasmus Hall. Even a chess prodigy in the USA isn't excused from school for weeks to play chess—and what “fees” does the London writer think American chess players get or expect for playing in tournaments?
It was known of course, that Reshevsky's refusal, as an orthodox Jew, to play on Fridays and Saturdays and the refusal of the tournament organizers to schedule his matches on other days, was a big handicap to our team. The London magazine also says the most important matches, by chance, seemed to fall on the days he could not play.
“If this were not enough,” says the News, our “next best player, William Lombardy, went driving a car without a license valid in Germany and involved himself in a minor accident. For several days he dared not start a game for fear that a summons to court might prevent him from finishing it!”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, January 25, 1959 - Page 81

Championship Chess by Blake Stevens, Texas State Champion
Bobby Fischer has added another feather to his cap, winning the U.S. national chess championship a full point ahead of Reshevsky and scoring six wins and five draws.
He turned in fine games against Reshevsky, Bisguier, and Mednis. This moves us to predict that young Fischer will tie for fourth place in the forthcoming Candidate's Tournament, and this will be a tremendous feat. Remember the stellar lineup includes Tahl, Petrosian, Smyslov, Keres, Gligoric, Olafsson and Benko.
The whole chess world knows that Fischer employs the Sicilian Defense almost exclusively. Will the Russians prepare traps in this opening? Undoubtedly.
The following game presents a deep pitfall in which black stumbles headlong. Fischer confronted with the possibility of making the same error that Black does in this game, would probably neatly sidestep the danger. The queen sacrifice offered by White is piquant and fantastically clever, unleashing a flood of tactics.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Tuesday, January 27, 1959 - Page 33

He's Chess Champ, But Still Just a Boy
By Milt Freudenheim

NEW YORK, Jan. 27.
The Chicago Daily News-Post-Dispatch Special Dispatch. Copyright 1959.
INTERNATIONAL grandmaster of chess Robert J. Fischer asked that presentation of his second consecutive United States championship cup be delayed briefly.
The presentation would have conflicted with his preparations for midyear examinations at Erasmus High School, where 15-year-old Fischer is in his junior year.
Bobby Fischer, said to be the youngest international grandmaster in the history of chess, won't slight his school work.
“If I had a lot of money, I'd like to play in chess tournaments (and nothing else). But you can't make a living in chess,” he says.
His prize as American champ was $600. It took the combined efforts of a television show, wealthy chess patrons, the United States Department and the Soviet Government to get him to Europe for big matches last year.
And the fact that Bobby—away from the chess board—is just a typical, big, clumsy, shy, self-centered teen-aged kid from Brooklyn has cooled the ardor of would be patrons more than once.
But the champ playing chess is another story. He held his own with some of the world's best at the interzonal tourney last summer at Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
“Little Bobby,” as enthusiastic Yugoslav fans dubbed him, won the right to return in September 1959 for eight-man playoffs.
The 1959 winner takes on world champion Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia in 1960.
If by some combination of wizardry and good luck, a teenage American beats the Soviet world champion, the repercussions could be awesome.
In contrast to the United States which ignores chess, and kids its experts, the Soviets teach the game in school. Russian champs are pampered, given soft jobs and movie-star treatment.
But like competing with the Russians in sputniks and luniks, polishing up Bobby Fischer will not be easy.
The six-foot, Chicago-born chess genius wishes the public would please go away. He may be the first boy his age in history to deliberately repel the advances of would-be biographers from Reader's Digest and the Saturday Evening Post.
Bobby contends the press aims to use him in a conspiracy “to make chess players look like funny people.”
Actually, he looks like the boy down the block, favoring bright flannel shirts, never a tie corduroy slacks, unshined shoes, crewcut brown hair needing a trim—even on an evening trip to a chess club in Manhattan.
Bobby handles himself like a basketball player, long-limbed and loose jointed, dropping a chess piece into place in a fast game of “rapid transit” (10 seconds a move) or “blitz” (no pauses at all).
He likes sports. Some New York reporters have shined up to him by taking him to hockey games or hitting tennis balls with him. A ski pro traded ski lessons for chess lessons with Bobby.
At Erasmus High, he studied Russian to use in Moscow, “I'm pretty good at Spanish, and I like science, astronomy most of all,” he says.
Born March 12, 1943, Bobby loved puzzles as a baby, according to his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, a nurse. His parents were divorced when he was 2.
His sister taught him chess when he was 6. In fourth grade he won a scholarship to a Brooklyn school where his chess was encouraged.
At the Brooklyn Chess Club, president Carmine Nigro “helped me more than anybody,” Bobby recalls. By the time he was 12, he was taking on big-timers at the Manhattan and Marshall Chess Clubs.
He was 14 when he beat famed Samuel Reshevsky, then 46, for the United States championship the first time. Repeating the feat a second year sealed Bobby's achievement. It couldn't be “luck” twice.
Short on friends his own age, Bobby spends most of his after school hours studying books on chess (which he remembers practically totally) and playing the game with adults.
Winning chess demands athlete-type training, boning up on opponents' past games, planning strategy. That plus schoolwork puts a heavy strain on Bobby's time.
For those who dare hope to checkmate the young champion, or others just interested in how he does it, book publishers Simon & Schuster are bringing out “Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess.”
Nearing 16, surrounded by chess glory, Bobby is beginning to notice the world now and then. “The other night he even came up and shook hands with my wife,” said a pleased former champion old enough to be Bobby's grandfather.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, Wednesday, January 28, 1959 - Page 25

Chess History Is Topic for Museum Film
An unusual color film on the history of chess will be shown at the Oakland Art Museum starting today, according to curator Paul Mills.
Entitled “Passionate Pastime,” the film is narrated by Vincent Price, who explains that chess, like painting, music, wine, women and gambling, is a passion. The film traces the game from its known beginnings up to 14-year-old champion Bobby Fischer.
A second color film on life along a Nigerian river, “Ai-Ye,” will also be shown.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 29, 1959 - Page 10

The U.S. championship
It is one thing for an underestimated young player to put up a single outstanding performance, quite another for him to repeat it when all his opponents are making an extra effort. Yet Bobby Fischer, aged 15, had done so in retaining the United States championship without loss of a game. Among the also-rans were Reshevsky who is often regarded as the world's best grandmaster outside Russia, and Benko, who is, like Fischer one of the last eight in the world title eliminating tournament. The result in New York indicates that Fischer ought to put up a good showing this autumn against Smyslov, Tal, and company. His best wins were in long endings, so here is another all-grand master game from the tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, February 08, 1959 - Page 34

Rosenwald Feature Game
Young Bobby Fischer, in winning the Rosenwald tournament for the second straight year, added insult to injury by defeating his chief rival, Reshevsky, with a trap that many “club” strength players would have seen. On only the ninth move Fischer sprung a trap that cost Reshevsky his queen for two minor pieces (the queen is worth at least three major pieces as a rule), and while the veteran struggled on for some 30 more moves he might have saved himself the trouble. When Reshevsky played 8 . . . N-R4 he unwittingly blocked his queen's escape path, and had to give it up to avoid a forced mate,
9. P-K5, N-K;
10. BxPch, KxB;
11. N-K6, KxN??;
12. Q-Q5ch, K-B4, P-N4ch and white mates in 3 more moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, February 12, 1959 - Page 6

National Ratings List Two Grand Masters
“The nation's two grand masters in these ratings, which do not take into account competition outside this country, are Samuel Reshevsky, who retains his No. 1 rank, and Robert J. (Bobby) Fischer. Reshevsky's rating is 2693 and Fischer's 2636.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Friday, February 13, 1959 - Page 19

A GAME OPPONENT—Studying the board in the mirror atop his iron lung, 17-year-old polio patient Bruce Campbell played a match with two-time U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer, 15, of Brooklyn, N.Y. The game was played at a hospital on Welfare Island, N.Y. where Bruce called out his moves and Bobby made them, and, incidentally, won the match.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, February 22, 1959 - Page 73

“Bobby Fischer of the U.S.A. defeated his title last month. Tahl has his work cut out, but we predict he will come through again.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal News, White Plains, New York, Wednesday, March 04, 1959 - Page 10

Ex-Chess Champion A Spring Valley Resident
Samuel Reshevsky Hopes to Recapture His American Title

By Richard Einhorn
If chess is considered a sport, then Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley must be the most famous athlete in Rockland County. Mr. Reshevsky, five feet two inches tall, has dominated American chess since 1936.
Now 47, he has been in the public eye longer than Joe Louis, Joe DiMaggio, or Ted Williams. Louis and DiMaggio, or Ted Williams. Louis and DiMaggio have retired, and Williams is near the end of the trail, but Reshevsky is playing as well as ever.
His ambition is to become champion of the world. He is determined to win that honor although he has been stripped of his United States title by a high school boy of immense talent.
Followers Optimistic
Reshevsky's followers feel that his loss to a 15-year-old Bobby Fischer was a fluke, that the famed international grandmaster will gain revenge on his brilliant young rival.
“I understand there are plans to arrange a match between Bobby Fischer and myself,” Reshevsky said last week. “I think everybody would like to see this match materialize.”
But Fischer hasn't said he's willing.
Like other leading American chess players, Reshevsky is starved for competition. He has gone for stretches of almost a year without playing in a tournament.
“What we need are at least four big events a year. I expected more from our players who are now in their twenties, but they haven't had enough competition.”
He said the best hope lies in young players like Bobby Fischer.
“It is a tremendous thing for the future of American chess that Fischer is so young,” Reshevsky said. “Youngsters all over the country are getting better.”
Likes Spring Valley
Reshevsky said that moving to Spring Valley from New York was one of the best things that had ever happened to him.
“It is quiet and peaceful,” he said. “A chess player needs rest and relaxation. You can hardly find a chess player in this town, though,” he added.
Most of Reshevsky's time has been spent at home with his wife, Norma, and their three children.
“Joel and Sylvia play chess,” he said proudly. “Only my two-year-old daughter doesn't.”
Reshevsky came to the United States in 1920 from Poland after having toured Europe as a nine-year-old prodigy. But his parents and advisers made him take time out from chess to complete his education.
He was a pitcher on his high school baseball team. Later he attended the University of Chicago, where he majored in mathematics.
Reshevsky said he would like to go into the insurance business in New York. His training apart from chess was in accountancy. He owns a number of chess sets, but his favorite is an olivewood set he won last year in a tournament in Israel.
Keeping his identity as a chess player, even when not playing a game, is no problem, he says. Every one of his dozens of neck-ties bears a chess symbol of some sort.
Reshevsky's future hopes center on a match with Mikhail Botvinnik of the USSR, the reigning world's champion. Botvinnik is Reshevsky's age, and he too, has held his own against younger men.
“Strange as it may seem,” Reshevsky said, “chess is a very taxing game. But if you have your health and lead a normal life you can remain a serious contender for many, many years. Botvinnik started at the same time I did.”
Reshevsky's recent record against Botvinnik has been good. In a team match between the United States and the Soviet Union in Moscow, Reshevsky won one and drew the other of their encounters.
Drew Four Games
Reshevsky also drew four games in a team match in New York with Vassily Smyslov, a Russian who temporarily displaced Botvinnik as champion. Most experts rate Smyslov on a par with Botvinnik.
“There isn't much to choose between Smyslov and Botvinnik,” Reshevsky said.
Besides Botvinnik and Smyslov, there are at least two other Soviet players of world championship caliber. And still others are clamoring for their place in the sun.
Why do the Russians have so many good players, Reshevsky was asked.
“All the good players in the U.S.S.R. are subsidized,” he explained. “They can devote all their time to chess.”
In a free enterprise system, he said, chess would have to be commercialized to permit players to compete full time. He said he hoped a promoter like Jack Kramer would sponsor touring groups of chess professionals.

[EDITOR NOTE — Reporter Dick Einhorn, Columbia University, was formerly a Chess Master. He has defeated, in informal games, United States Champion Bobby Fischer, and former American champs, Larry Evans, Arthur Bisguier, and Arnold Denker.]

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Saturday, March 14, 1959 - Page 11

U.S. Whiz Enters
BUENOS AIRES—(AP)—The Argentine Chess federation said yesterday U.S. Master Bob Fischer, just turned 16, has accepted an invitation to play in an international tourney in Mar del Plata later this month.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Monday, March 16, 1959 - Page 12

Yugoslavs Like U.S. Chess Whiz
BELGRADE, March 15 (AP)—Yugoslavian chess fans are so wild about 16-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn they have named one of their chess clubs after him and think he may endanger Soviet chess supremacy.
This summer Yugoslavia will play host to one of the biggest events in world chess — the challengers' tournament. The winner will meet the world champion, Russia's grand master Mihail Botvinnik for the title.
Bobby became extremely popular in Yugoslavia last year when he played at Portoroz tournament and placed among the top entries for the challengers' tourney.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 26

CHESS — Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, yesterday defeated Ruben Shocron of Argentina in 40 moves. The 15-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy scored his third victory in an international tournament. He has drawn twice and lost twice and has four points …

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, March 15, 1959 - Page 28

“Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn champion of the United States held on to his title for the second year in a row. Bobby keeps up with all the latest traps in the opening. His victim in the sixth round was no one less than the great Sammy Reshevsky.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, March 22, 1959 - Page 94

Chess For Children
Reinfeld, a prolific American writer and a master chess player, has refined his chess vocabulary down to the level of the beginner, and has produced a book for both the child and the novice adult. Unique is his introduction in which he explains that “there are no less than 169,518,829,100,544 quadrillion ways to play the first 10 moves of a game of chess,” but that even a youngster can learn from a few basic patterns. Proof of this is the fact that the current United States champion is Bobby Fischer, a 14-year-old.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 40

FISCHER CHESS VICTOR
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, March 31 (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, today defeated Ruben Shocron of Argentina in 40 moves. The 15-year-old Brooklyn school boy scored his third victory in an international tournament. He has drawn twice and lost twice and has four points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 21

Fischer Victor Over Shocron
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, yesterday defeated Ruben Shocron of Argentina in 40 moves.
The 15-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy scored his third victory in an international tournament. He has drawn twice and lost twice and has four points.
Ludek Pachman, the Czech grand master, and Yugoslavia's Boris Ivkov, drew in 20 moves. Both are undefeated. Pachman, having played one more game than Ivkov, leads the tournament with 5½ points. Ivkov has 4½

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 26, 1959 - Page 48

FISCHER IN SANTIAGO
Bobby Fischer, youthful U.S. chess champion, flew north after completing the tournament at Mar del Plata, Argentina, and stopped off for another international event at Santiago, Chile.
Here Fischer will be called upon to face some of the same opponents he encountered in the Argentine resort. On the list are Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia, Joao de Souza Mendes of Brazil and Hermann Pilnik and Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina.
Fischer, who took time off from Erasmus High School in Brooklyn to develop his chess career, will continue busy for some months. He is due in Zurich, Switzerland for a tournament from May 19 to June 8. This will be part of a jubilee celebration in that city.
The major event for which Fischer is preparing is the candidates tournament to determine a challenger for the world chess championship. The American ace is one of eight grandmasters who will compete for that honor in Yugoslavia in a quadruple round-robin tournament which will last from Sept. 6 to Oct. 31.
Fischer played erratically in Mar del Plata, losing two of his first five games, then scoring seven wins and a draw of his last eight. The following games are from the event.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, April 26, 1959 - Page 4

“…Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old chess wizard from Brooklyn, wins his first match in the International tournament at Santiago, Chile…”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Monday, April 27, 1959 - Page 12

Fischer Wins Chess Match Over Stekel
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Bobby Fischer 16-year-old chess wizard from Brooklyn, won his first match in the international tournament Saturday when he defeated M. Stekel of Chile.
The victory gave Fischer one point compared to three by Ludek Pachmann of Czechslovakia, the leader.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, Maryland, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 17

Bobby Fischer In Chess Lead
ZURICH, Switzerland (AP) — Bobby Fischer, U.S. national champion from Brooklyn took a clear lead in the International Chess Tournament here Saturday night when he beat Josef Kupper of Switzerland in a fourth round game.
Fischer has 3½ points in the standing. His leading rivals, Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal of Russia have three each and Svetozar Gilgoric of Yugoslavia has two.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 17

Strictly Personal
Chess the Most Underpaid Intellectual Profession
By Sydney Harris

LITTLE BOBBY Fischer, the 16-year-old chess champion, nearly walked out of an international tournament in Chile last month, when he learned that the prize money had been cut in half. “More trophies don't interest me,” he grunted.
If Bobby had read a few histories of the royal game, he would have been neither disappointed nor surprised. Chess is probably the most underpaid intellectual profession known to man, and the total annual earnings of the greatest masters wouldn't keep a Hollywood starlet in brassieres.

In the melancholy history of chess, most masters have died in poverty, Steinitz, the finest player of the 19th century, ended his life as a charity case. The man who took the crown away from him, Emmanuel Lasker, was so embittered by his meager chess earnings that, in 1930's, he applied to Ely Culbertson for a diploma as a bridge teacher.

AND THE most brilliant player of our time, Alekhine, spent his declining years in playing games for coffee and cigaret money in seedy, sour-smelling clubs.

Only two world's champion's within memory have been able to live with a modicum of prosperity. Capablanca was at an early age given a diplomatic post by his Cuban government, for which he did little except play chess and build up nebulous “good will” for his country.

And in Russia, Botvinnik for years was given a handsome government salary as an engineer, although most of his engineering was performed over the chess-board.

ONE REASON for Russia's latter-day pre-eminence in chess is that it supports its fine players the way we support baseball and football figures, who are not supposed to do anything but contribute to the greater glory of the sport.

Most of the first-rate American players have been so busy scrounging for a living that they have had neither the time nor the energy to prepare fully for championship tournaments. The Russians beat us not by brains, but by subsidy.

I hope little Bobby has more sense than to try to make a career out of chess in this country. It simply cannot be done. Americans look upon chess as a freakish activity, not deserving the awesome respect we accord to baseball, hockey, football and six-day bike races. We are willing to pay anything but a display of brains.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 21

“Taken from the book “Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess” and is entitled, “The Game of the Century” played in the Rosenwald Trophy Tournament in 1956. This was awarded first brilliancy prize.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 60

“There are two interesting chess books on the market now. One is the life and games of Emmanuel Lasker, the other is the games of chess Bobby Fischer has played.
No two grandmasters could be more different.
Bobby Fischer, now 16, was the youngest grandmaster of all time. Seeming to have no other interest, he's still going strong in his bid for the world championship.
Lasker, on the other hand, was a philosopher, mathematician, poet and, though he intensely disliked the game, was for 28 years (from 1894) the world's chess champion.
As different as the chess players are the books. Fischer's annotated by himself, is about his own meteoric chess career (May 1955 to May 1958): the games themselves with the author's comments at strategic moves. The book about Lasker is both a biography of his personal life and its relation to his life of chess, including more than 100 of his greatest games. Written by Dr. J. Hannak (in German) and translated by Albert Einstein, it is considered the standard work on Lasker. (Unfortunately there are an annoying number of typographical errors in the text).
Fischer is obviously a brilliant chess player; Lasker was brilliant in many ways. Readers primarily interested in modern chess motifs will want Fischer's book; those interested in the lives of the important and near-great men will want the book about Lasker. Both make valuable additions to chess libraries. — KC

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, July 05, 1959 - Page 74

“At Zurich, Bobby Fischer played steady, cool chess, and always obtained equality in the opening, from the Black side, either in the Sicilian Defense (his game against Duckstein) or in the King's Indian Defense (as in today's game).
After attaining equality, he employed a clever strategem—he did nothing! And like all true mullets rising to the bait, his opponents tried to force the issue, counting on their experience to over-run this baby (Fischer is only 16).
This is the story behind many of the games in this tournament and to re-enforce my point, here is another example.

Precision play by the young aspirant to the chess throne.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, July 12, 1959 - Page 37

The King's Men: World Title Hope Seen In Fischer
By Merrill Dowden

Inasmuch as a crystal ball is not included in the equipage of this department, and I am not exactly proficient in palmistry or the reading of tea leaves, I usually shy away from prognosticating as one would the plague.
However, for this once I'm crawling to the very tip of a very long limb (leaving plenty of room for the saw behind) to predict:
1. That the United States will produce a world chess champion within the next decade.
2. That our champion will be one Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who now has reached the ripe old age of 16.
Maybe that phrase, “next decade,” seems that I'm giving myself plenty of rope, but it must be remembered that more than a century has elapsed since we produced our first and only world champion, Paul Morphy.
Bobby, whose “Fischer's Games of Chess” was reviewed in this column a couple weeks ago, already has taken a long step toward the championship. He is the present United States titlist, and is generally regarded as the strongest player for his age in history.
Bobby lost no time in getting started to fame and fortune through the royal game. Born in Chicago on March 9, 1943, he learned the chess moves in 1949 from his sister Joan, then 11. “She often bought different games at a candy store,”Bobby writes, “and one day happened to buy a chess set. We figured out the moves from the directions that came with the set.
And Bobby has been figuring them out ever since, to the consternation of almost every opponent he has faced.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 02, 1959 - Page 104

Young Contender
BOBBY FISCHER'S GAMES OF CHESS—By Bobby Fischer; Simon and Schuster; $2.95; 97 pp.
The thirty-four chess games scored in this book represent the first collection of important tournament games played by the author, U.S. Open Chess Champion for 1958 and 1959, possible contender for the World Championship in the near future and, at 15, the youngest International Grand master of all time. Preceded by a review of his chess career the volume includes his 13 games played in the U.S. Open Tournament of 1957-1958, the 20 games he played in the 1958 Interzonal Matches in Yugoslavia and his prize-winning “Game of the Century” from the Rosenwald Trophy Tournament of 1956, called one of the most amazing feats of combinative depth and brilliancy by a 13-year-old in the long history of chess prodigies.
Annotation for fourteen of the games is by the author—the Interzonals were not annotated because of the lack of time and the pressure of school work—and these notes provide a valuable insight into the analytical resource and technical skill of one of the great chess minds of our time. This book will be a first-rate addition to anyone's chess library. Players of any degree of skill will get a great deal of pleasure from playing over Bobby Fischer's games against the leading world masters and will most certainly profit by becoming more familiar with the latest and soundest lines in chess.
ARTHUR RANDALL.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Miami News, Miami, Florida, Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 7

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS
‘How About Check, Mate?’

Wire Services of The Miami News
The mother of America's chess prodigy, Bobby Fischer, who hopes to wrest the world's chess championship from Russia, appealed today for financial aid so her son can enter the playoffs in Yugoslavia.
Mrs. Regina Fischer, of Brooklyn, said she and her 16-year-old son, the youngest international grand master in the world, have saved nearly $2000 — half the amount needed to pay the expenses for the nearly two-month long tournament.
“With another $2000 Bobby could be sure of being able to take part in this tournament,” Mrs. Fischer said.
Frank Brady, business manager of the U.S. Chess Federation, said that if the Fischers do not raise the money soon Bobby probably will not be able to participate.
The candidates tournament is scheduled to begin in Bled, Yugoslavia Sept. 6 and will last until Oct. 31. This will be an elimination tournament and the winner will face the present world champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Daily Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Saturday, August 08, 1959 - Page 9

Bobby Fischer Hopes to Take Chess Laurels
By Bart Kinch, United Press International
NEW YORK (UPI)—The mother of America's chess prodigy, Bobby Fischer, who hopes to wrest the world's chess championship from Soviet Russia, appealed today for financial aid so her son can enter the playoffs in Yugoslavia.
Mrs. Regina Fischer of Brooklyn N.Y., said she and her 16-year-old son, the youngest international grand master in the world, have saved nearly $2000—half the amount needed to pay the expenses for the nearly two month long tournament.
“With another $2000 Bobby could be sure of being able to take part in this tournament,” Mrs. Fischer said.
Frank Brady, business manager of the U.S. Chess Federation said that if the Fischers do not raise the money within a few days Bobby probably will not be able to participate.
“Actually, the International Chess Federation has stated that formal notice of availability be forwarded to the federation's headquarters in Sweden by Aug. 3,” Brady said.
“However, there is a degree of flexibility in the date and I'm sure that if Bobby raises the money by Aug. 10 his formal guarantee that he will play will be accepted.”
The candidates tournament is scheduled to begin in Bled, Yugoslavia on Sept. 6 and will last until Oct. 31. This will be an elimination tournament and the winner will face the present world champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960.
Mrs. Fischer said that from March to June Bobby represented the United States in international chess events in Argentina, Chile and Switzerland. He won $300 which he is using to help defray the expenses of the upcoming Yugoslav trip—if he can make it.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Sunday, August 09, 1959 - Page 35

Chess Genius Without Pin Money, Says Mom
NEW YORK (HTNS) — From a letter to the editor this department learned its favorite athlete, Bobby Fischer, the chess genius, is still over in Yugoslavia and that his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, a nurse living in Brooklyn, is much concerned over the alleged refusal of the local chess authorities to kick through with proper walking-around money, etc.
It seems that each big chess player — and Bobby is the United States champion at the age of 16 — has a person designated as his “second.” This adjunct does not function like a Whitey Biemstein, patching cuts and exhorting to a new violence with the left-right-left. The chess “second” goes over gambits and Fanchet-to openings like the kings indian, and tries to keep his boy on the qui vive, so to speak.
Well, Mrs. Fischer says that the chess poobahs have been giving Bobby the brushoff. He and she, she says, have been putting up the boodle out of nursing and prize money. Unless something fiscal and immediate is done, she claims, Bobby will lose his place in the challengers' tournament for the world championship currently held by Mikhail Botvinnik, a Russian.

WRONG NUMBER
Local chess buffs did not seem to think that the champ's dam was telling the whole story. Nonetheless it was hard to pin down a story which was more convincing. It was suggested that we call a Morris J. Kasper, who was described as treasurer of the American Chess Foundation.
The number provided turned out to be the Lenox Hill Republican Club and the volunteer who answered had never heard of Mr. Kasper. He may even be a Democrat.
Other chess buffs, among them Hermann Helms, venerable and sprightly advocate of the Ruy Lopez opening, asserted that the foundation had agreed to contribute $2000 toward a “second” and other needed assets for Bobby but his mother wouldn't accept unless she were vouchsafed a look at the book.

A TICKET HOME
“Young Fischer has a ticket home which was given him by that television show (‘I've Got a Secret’(, but his mother won't let him come back,” said Helms. “He could come back here and play for $1,200 in the New Jersey log cabin tournament which is sponsored by the U.S. Chess Federation. But that isn't what his mother wants.”
The material we gathered indicated that the absent Bobby is a non-participating junior at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn.
He has been away from this country since March. He played in Argentina and Chile, then moved to Europe. He has played no official chess since Chile but he is eligible as U.S. champion to play in the challenge tournament, involving eight masters which will be played in three Yugoslav cities — Bled, Zagreb and Belgrade — from Sept. 6 to Oct 29.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Des Moines Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, August 10, 1959 - Page 6

No Money for Travel For Our Chess Champ
Sixteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, reigning United States chess champion, won the right last year to compete in European matches designed to pick a challenger for World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik of the Soviet Union. Young Fischer did so well he has been invited to come back next month as one of a select group of eight finalists that includes four Russians. But the invitation may have to be rejected.
Young Fischer's mother explains in a letter to the New York Herald Tribune that he has “already poured his own prize winnings, and my money, into essential preparations for this tournament.” The American chess champion is $2,000 short of being able to meet expenses. Mrs. Fischer declares: “The indifference to his plight and the constant suspense, not knowing whether he will or won't have the funds to be able to compete are having a terrible effect on him… The continual uncertainty and trying to raise funds somewhere, somehow from one tournament to the next is killing.”
American chess players, unlike their European competitors, have no organizations to provide backing or access to government help. Fischer was able to compete in Europe last year only because he won travel tickets on a television show.
The Russians go to great lengths in supporting chess. The game is taught in school, and leading players are given soft jobs and preferential treatment. The four Russians who will compete in the final eliminations will have seconds, physical trainers and full financial support.
Americans should not become chess conscious in order to “match the Russians”. But Americans should be proud of a youngster good enough to match wits with the world's best chess brains, and with a chance to compete for the world's highest chess honor.
If the United States can regularly send track stars and wrestlers abroad to compete with foreign athletes, surely $2,000 isn't too much for Americans to raise for our chess champion to enter international matches.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Casper Star-Tribune, Casper, Wyoming, Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 11

Fischer — Bobby Fischer Games of Chess

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail, Charleston, West Virginia, Sunday, September 20, 1959 - Page 66

Speaking Of Chess
THE TOURNAMENT to produce a challenger for a title match with World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik is now under way in Yugoslavia. The games will be played in more than one location, starting with Bled — location of the great 1931 international tournament where Alekhine won one of his greatest triumphs.
The 1959 American representative, young Bobby Fischer, chess champion of the United States while still in his teens, is having some rather spectacular ups and downs. The ups consist of first and fourth round wins over Paul Keres and Svetozar Gligoric, respectively.
The downs are represented by second and sixth round losses to two of the Russian contingent, Tigran Petrosian (an Armenian) and Mikhail Tal (a Latvian). Bobby drew Paul Benko in round three and adjourned his fifth round game with Frederik Olafson, in a position somewhat favorable to his Icelandic opponent.
AT THIS challengers' tournament is a double round-robin affair, Bobby still has pretty fair chances — at least in theory. After six rounds, Petrosian led the field, 4 to 1; Tal had 3½ to 2½ and Keres 3 to 2. But if Fischer has already lost twice, he is in good company with such noted and experienced grandmasters as Vassily Smyslov and Paul Keres.
However, the U.S. champion will probably settle down and finish with a good score — perhaps even win the coveted first prize. In this chess event it is First or nothing. There is no second prize comparable to the winner's opportunity to play for the chess championship of the world. But the young American has another strong asset along with his demonstrated skill, his youthful stamina.
He is the youngest of all the contenders in the challenge tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Friday, October 02, 1959 - Page 13

THE ONLY REAL, MAJOR STAR who has gone forward and upward during the past year has been sixteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion. But even Bobby has had his disappointments. In his case, considering his youth and his gifts, the setbacks are minor, indeed. Still they indicate that Fischer has quite a way to go before he comes as good as Sammy Reshevsky at his peak, and Mikhail Botvinnik, the present titleholder.
Fischer retained his American championship; qualified for a major tournament by finishing fifth in Yugoslavia; and came in third in a fine field in Zurich. In Zurich, he had not lost any games until the twelfth round and then he was beaten twice, just enough for him to lose out to Mikhail Tal of Russia. Nevertheless, Bobby is no flash-in-the-pan and his constant good showings prove his basic solidity as a player. A few more years of such tournament play will give to Fischer the necessary experience to meet Botvinnik, or whoever will be the champion when Bobby is ready for him.
★ ★ ★

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Green Bay Press-Gazette, Green Bay, Wisconsin, Saturday, October 03, 1959 - Page 16

“…“Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess,” Bobby Fischer;…

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Saturday, October 10, 1959 - Page 8

U.S. Draws With Reds
ZAGREB, Yugoslavia (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the U.S. chess champion, drew Thursday in his match with Soviet champion Tigran Petrosjan in the continuation of their adjourned match from the 16th round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Index-Journal, Greenwood, South Carolina, Tuesday, October 20, 1959 - Page 8

BOBBY FISCHER'S GAMES OF CHESS, by Robert Fischer: “The youngest international grandmaster of chess annotates 14 or the games he played in U.S. championship tournaments. The plays of his 21 games in the Interzonal tournament of 1958 are recorded without commentary.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Indiana, Tuesday, November 03, 1959 - Page 15

SPORT SHORTS
CHESS
Bobby Fischer, 16, the world's youngest grand master and champion of the United States, is symbolically the best player from the Western Hemisphere. The last match completed in the world challengers tournament at Belgrade in which Russian grand master Tigran Petrosjan defeated Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia enabled New Yorker Fischer to share fifth place in the final standings. Mikhail Tal of Latvia finished first with 20 points, Paul Keres of Russia, second with 18.5; Petrosjan, third with 16.5, and Vasil Smyslov of Russia, fourth with 15. Fischer and Gligoric tied for fifth with 12.5 each.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Daily Tribune, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, Saturday, November 07, 1959 - Page 3

”Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess” by Robert Fischer—Brings together a wide variety of information on chess terminology, play, players, publications and organizations.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959